Paying the Premium: A Military Insurance Policy for Peace and Freedom

By Walter Hahn; H. Joachim Maitre | Go to book overview

3
Army Forces for the Future

Lt. Gen. John W. Woodmansee Jr., USA (Ret.)

As Gen. Donn Starry suggests in Chapter 2, probably never before in the nation's history have U.S. defense planners confronted as rapidly shifting scenarios of global change and national defense requirements and priorities. On the one hand, developments such as the dissolution of the Soviet empire, followed by the unraveling of the Soviet Union itself, along with the trends of militarization and conflict in the Third World, signal a world in volatile transition, with largely unpredictable implications for U.S. security. On the other hand, the reality of a shrinking defense budget and substantial reductions in the armed forces call for clear vision and painful choices.

It is with a view to the prospect of limitless potential for conflict on our small, warring planet and the reality of constrained resources that we must go about developing a long-range defense program that can provide an adequate "insurance policy" against future risks to our security. History teaches us that the last war is rarely a reliable guide to the requirements of the next one. Still, any projection of future security requirements must heed recent experience--in this case, the Gulf War.


DESERT STORM AND AIRLAND BATTLE

The victory achieved by the U.S.-led coalition forces in Operation Desert Storm unquestionably will go down as one of the most decisive, with fewest casualties for the victorious side, of any campaign of comparable magnitude in history. It ranks with Gen. Douglas MacArthur's Inchon invasion and breakout of the Pusan perimeter in 1951 as the best in America's rich military heritage.

-33-

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Paying the Premium: A Military Insurance Policy for Peace and Freedom
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Military Studies ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1: In Search of an American "Defense Insurance Policy" 1
  • Notes 11
  • 2: Risks and Uncertainties in a Changing World 13
  • Note 31
  • 3: Army Forces for the Future 33
  • 4: Naval Forces for the Future 55
  • 5: Tactical Air Forces for the Future 71
  • 6: Marine Forces for the Future 93
  • Notes 109
  • 7: Strategic Forces for the Future 111
  • Notes 122
  • 8: Coping with Global Missile Proliferation 123
  • 9: The Pivotal Elements: Airlift and Sealift 141
  • 10: The Need for Forward Prepositioning 159
  • 11: The U.S. Defense- Industrial Base 173
  • Notes 184
  • 12: Conclusion: How the Challenges and Dangers of the Post-Containment Era Can Be Mastered 185
  • Notes 189
  • Index 191
  • About the Editors and Contributors 197
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