Paying the Premium: A Military Insurance Policy for Peace and Freedom

By Walter Hahn; H. Joachim Maitre | Go to book overview

8
Coping with Global Missile Proliferation

Gen. John L. Piotrowski, USAF (Ret.)

The Iran-Iraq war was still in the early phase of what was to become an eight- year bloodbath of attrition. An E-3A AWACS, part of the contingent deployed to Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, since late 1980, was on patrol, executing racetrack orbits parallel to the Persian Gulf. Three weapons technicians aboard the aircraft were peering into the twinkling green-on-green displays, watching for Iranian and Iraqi aircraft that might pose a threat to Saudi Arabia. Suddenly the AWACS crew's boredom was broken by a rapid trace of processed radar returns on the screen. The crew had never before observed this unique pattern of closely spaced dots rapidly retracing themselves: they emanated from Iraqi territory and terminated near Teheran.

Upon landing, the AWACS crew was informed that the timing, location, and direction of the observed radar scope phenomenon correlated with an SS-1 Scud ballistic missile launched from Iraq into Iran. The "war of the cities" had begun, and with it the second missile bombardment of the twentieth century--the first since Hitler attempted to bring Great Britain to her knees with a rain of V-2 rockets.

The event was scarcely noted in the United States. After all, it transpired in a war remote from America's preoccupations at the time--a war, moreover, between two nations, neither of which drew much sympathy from Americans. No one could imagine at the time that, several years later, similar Iraqi Scuds would take on a different and very direct meaning for U.S. and allied forces deployed along the Persian Gulf, for Saudi citizens in Dhahran and Riyadh, and for the Israeli populations of Tel Aviv and Haifa.

In the Gulf War, the initial impact of this "terror weapon" was blunted

-123-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Paying the Premium: A Military Insurance Policy for Peace and Freedom
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 204

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.