quently the several States would not be possessed of any essential power or effective guard of sovereignty.

Thus I apprehend, it is evident that the consolidation of the States into one national government (in contra-distinction from a confederacy) would be the necessary consequence of the establishment of the new constitution, and the intention of its framers--and that consequently the State sovereignties would be eventually annihilated, though the forms may long remain as expensive and burdensome remembrances of what they were in the days when (although laboring under many disadvantages) they emancipated this country from foreign tyranny, humbled the pride and tarnished the glory of royalty, and erected a triumphant standard to liberty and independence.

A FARMER


Antifederalist No. 40
ON THE MOTIVATIONS AND AUTHORITY OF THE FOUNDING FATHERS

Antifederalists found it somewhat difficult to confute the effects of George Washington's and Benjamin Franklin's support of the Constitution. Other Federalists were fairer game. As Charles Warren has pointed out, several Federalists had been "lukewarm toward independence," and many had barely reached adolescence when the American Revolution commenced. Antifederalists therefore could (and did) cast doubt upon their patriotism to the rebel cause. ( "Elbridge Gerry, James Warren, Mercy Warren and the Ratification of the Federal Constitution in Massachusetts," Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Society, Boston, 1932, LXIV, 143-64).

Washington, however, was revered by the vast majority of the American people. Thus, one finds a whole range of Antifederalist explanations--he was tricked into signing the document; he has subsequently changed his mind; etc. Surprisingly, many Antifederalists did meet the problem head on, and attacked Washington directly--the first sustained attack on Washington in his civilian and political capacity.

The selection by "PHILADELPHIENSIS"--Benjamin Workman (see Antifederalist No. 74)--is from his third and fifth essays, reprinted in the [ Boston] American Herald, January 14 and 21, 1788, from a Philadelphia newspaper.

The excerpt from an essay by "AN AMERICAN" appeared in the [ Boston] American Herald, January 28, 1788.

"A FARMER AND PLANTER" appeared in The Maryland Journal, and Baltimore Advertiser, April 1, 1788 (see Antifederalist No. 26).

The piece by Patrick Henry is from his speech before the Virginia ratifying convention, June 4, 1788, reprinted in Elliot, III, 222-23.

The selections from "CENTINEL" appeared in the [ Philadelphia] Independent Gazetteer, November 8, 1787, and January 2 and 8, 1788, reprinted in McMaster and Stone, pp. 593-96, 624, 627.

The final selection is excerpted from the essay by 'THE YEOMANRY OF MASSACHUSETTS" in The Massachusetts Gazette, January 25, 1788.

-107-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Antifederalist Papers
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 260

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.