we view them thus possessed of the sword in one hand and the purse strings of the people in the other, we can see no security left for them in the enjoyment of their liberties, but what may proceed from the bare possibility that this supreme authority of the nation may be possessed of virtue and integrity sufficient to influence them in the administration of equal justice and equity among those whom they shall govern. But why should we voluntarily choose to trust our all upon so precarious a tenure as this? We confess it gives us pain to anticipate the future scene: a scene presenting to view miseries so complicated and extreme, that it may be part of the charms of eloquence to extenuate, or the power of art to remove.

CONSIDER ARMS MALICHI MAYNARD SAMUEL FIELD


Antifederalist No. 53 A PLEA FOR THE RIGHT OF RECALL

The major queries of the Antifederalists invariably indicated a concern that the people would be screened out of an effective voice in government. A significant question, therefore, was: to what extent would representatives vote according to the known sentiments of the people they serve? Or, as in colonial days, would representatives act only according to the dictates of their own reason? The fact that this particular issue was so widely and keenly debated indicated the burgeoning interest in politics caused by the debates on the Constitution.

Even after the Constitution was ratified, demands were made for amendments to guarantee a more responsive legislature. "AMICUS" offered South Carolinians such advice in the following essay which appeared in the Columbian Herald, August 28, 1788.

Some time before a Convention of the United States was held, I mentioned in a paragraph which was published in one of the Charlestown papers, that it would be acting wisely in the formation of a constitution for a free government, to enact, that the electors should recall their representatives when they thought proper, although they should be chosen for a certain term of years; as a right to appoint (where the right of appointing originates with the appointers) implies a right to recall. As the persons appointed are meant to act for the benefit of the appointers, as well as themselves, they, if they mean to act for their mutual benefit, can have no objection to a proposal of this kind. But if they have any sinister designs, they will certainly oppose it, foreseeing that their electors will displace them as soon as they begin to act contrary to their interest. I am therefore glad to find that the state of New York has proposed an amendment of this kind to the federal constitution, viz: That the legislatures of the respective states may recall their senators, or either of them, and elect others in their stead, to serve the remainder of the time for which the senators so recalled were appointed. I wish this had been

-152-

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