they please. I have made an estimate which shows with what facility they will be able to reelect him. The number of electors is equal to the number of representatives and senators; viz., ninety-one. They are to vote for two persons. They give, therefore, one hundred and eighty-two votes. Let there be forty-five votes for four different candidates, and two for the President. He is one of the five highest, if he have but two votes, which he may easily purchase. In this case, by the 3d clause of the 1st section of the 2d article, the election is to be by the representatives, according to states. Let New Hampshire be for him,--a majority of its

3 representatives is 2
Rhode Island, 1 1
Connecticut, 5 3
New Jersey, 4 3
Delaware, 1 1
Georgia, 3 2
North Carolina, 5 3
A majority of seven states is 15
Thus the majority of seven states is but 15, while the minority amounts
to 50.
The total number of voices (91 electors and 65 representatives) is 156
Voices in favor of the President are, 2 state electors and 15
Representatives 17
139

So that the President may be reelected by the voices of 17 against 139.

It may be said that this is an extravagant case, and will never happen. In my opinion, it will often happen. A person who is a favorite of Congress, if he gets but two votes of electors, may, by the subsequent choice of 15 representatives, be elected President. Surely the possibility of such a case ought to be excluded.


Antifederalist No. 69
THE CHARACTER OF THE EXECUTIVE OFFICE

The executive office was so powerful, Antifederalists believed, that a president might easily perpetuate his administration for an unconscionable time. The twenty-second amendment to the Constitution is, therefore, in the Anti- federalist tradition, for it was their common criticism that the proposed document did not limit the number of terms for which a president could hold office.

The following essay by "THE FEDERAL FARMER," Richard Henry Lee, is taken from the Additional Letters, pp. 123-30.

The great object is, in a republican government, to guard effectually against perpetuating any portion of power, great or small, in the same man or

-201-

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