Madame Bovary: Life in a Country Town

By Gustave Flaubert; Gerard Hopkins | Go to book overview

SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY

Two editions of the French text of Madame Bovary may be recommended:

(i) ed. Mark Overstall ( London, Harrap, 1979), introduction and notes in English

(ii) ed. Claudine Gothot-Mersch ( Paris, Garnier, 1971), the standard French critical edition

Readers who have enjoyed Madame Bovary should go on to try L'Éducation sentimentale, Trois contes, and perhaps Bouvard et Pécuchet; all are available in paperback English translations. Salammbô and La Tentation de Saint Antoine are for addicts.

A selection of Flaubert's letters is presented in Francis Steegmuller's The Letters of Gustave Flaubert 1830-1857 ( Cambridge, Mass., and London, Harvard University Press, 1980); it is from this translation that most of the passages quoted above in the Introduction have been taken. The most up-to-date and informative biography of Flaubert is Herbert Lottmann's Flaubert: a Biography ( London, Methuen, 1989).

Three essays on Flaubert by Henry James, first published in 1876, 1893 and 1902, provide a good starting-point for critical reading on Flaubert and an interesting picture of the development of James's ideas. The whole of the substantial 1902 essay, originally an introduction to a translation of Madame Bovary, and sections of the other two relevant to this novel, may be found in Henry James: The Critical Muse. Selected Literary Criticism ( Penguin, 1987). Among more recent studies in English, the following (in chronological order of publication) are recommended:

Thorlby, Anthony, Gustave Flaubert and the Art of Realism ( London, Bowes and Bowes, 1956)

Ullman, Stephen, Style in the French Novel ( Oxford, Blackwell, 1960)

Fairlie, Alison, Flaubert: Madame Bovary ( London, Edward Arnold, 1962)

Levin, Harry, The Gates of Horn: a Study of Five French Realists ( New York, Oxford University Press, 1963)

Bart, B. F, Madame Bovary and the Critics: a Collection of Essays ( New York University Press, 1966)

Brombert, Victor, The Novels of Flaubert: a Study of Themes and Techniques ( Princeton University Press, 1966)

Steegmuller, Francis, Flaubert and Madame Bovary (revised edition) ( London and Melbourne, Macmillan, 1968)

-xxi-

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Madame Bovary: Life in a Country Town
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • Select Bibliography xxi
  • A Chronology of Gustave Flaubert xxiii
  • Part One - Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 10
  • Chapter II 17
  • Chapter II 22
  • Chapter II 27
  • Chapter VI 31
  • Chapter VII 35
  • Chapter VII 41
  • Chapter VII 50
  • Part Two - Chapter I 61
  • Chapter II 69
  • Chapter II 75
  • Chapter II 85
  • Chapter II 89
  • Chapter VI 98
  • Chapter VII 110
  • Chapter VIII 117
  • Chapter VIII 138
  • Chapter VIII 148
  • Chapter VIII 156
  • Chapter XII 169
  • Chapter XIII 182
  • Chapter XIV 191
  • Chapter XIV 201
  • Part Three - Chapter I 211
  • Chapter I 211
  • Chapter II 225
  • Chapter II 234
  • Chapter II 236
  • Chapter II 239
  • Chapter II 255
  • Chapter II 271
  • Chapter II 284
  • Chapter II 301
  • Chapter X 309
  • Chapter XI 314
  • Explanatory Notes 325
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