Madame Bovary: Life in a Country Town

By Gustave Flaubert; Gerard Hopkins | Go to book overview

which eddied in the wind and settled afar off, like so many white butterflies, on a field of red flowering clover.

At last, about six o'clock, the cab stopped* in a lane of the Beauvoisine quarter, and a woman got out. She walked away with her veil lowered, and did not once turn her head.


CHAPTER II

ON arriving at the inn, Madame Bovary was surprised to find that the diligence was no longer there. Hivert had waited for fifty-three minutes, at the end of which time he had started without her.

There was no compulsion on her to leave, but she had given her word that she would be home that evening. Besides, Charles would be waiting for her, and she was already conscious of that feeling of apathetic docility which, for many women, is at once the penalty of adultery and its atonement. She hurriedly packed her trunks, paid her bill, took a cab which was standing in the yard, and, by dint of pestering the driver with protests, encouragement and inquiries about what the time was and how far they had gone, managed to overtake the Swallow just as it was passing the first houses of Quincampoix.

Scarcely had she sat down in her corner than she closed her eyes, and did not open them again until they were at the bottom of the hill, where she saw Félicité in the distance standing in front of the forge, on the lookout for her. Hivert reined in his horses, and the cook, hoisting herself up to the level of the window, said, with an air of mystery:

'Please go at once to Monsieur Homais's, ma'am, it's very urgent.'

Silence, as usual, brooded over the village. At every corner of every street were little reddish heaps from which steam rose into the air, for it was the jam-making season, and in Yonville all the housewives chose the same day for the boiling of their fruit. But the particular heap which stood in front of the chemist's shop was large enough to attract general attention, and could claim over its competitors that superiority which belongs of right to a laboratory in comparison with mere private stoves, to something which proceeds from a general need and not simply and solely from a private whim.

She entered. The large armchair was overturned, and even the

-225-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Madame Bovary: Life in a Country Town
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • Select Bibliography xxi
  • A Chronology of Gustave Flaubert xxiii
  • Part One - Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 10
  • Chapter II 17
  • Chapter II 22
  • Chapter II 27
  • Chapter VI 31
  • Chapter VII 35
  • Chapter VII 41
  • Chapter VII 50
  • Part Two - Chapter I 61
  • Chapter II 69
  • Chapter II 75
  • Chapter II 85
  • Chapter II 89
  • Chapter VI 98
  • Chapter VII 110
  • Chapter VIII 117
  • Chapter VIII 138
  • Chapter VIII 148
  • Chapter VIII 156
  • Chapter XII 169
  • Chapter XIII 182
  • Chapter XIV 191
  • Chapter XIV 201
  • Part Three - Chapter I 211
  • Chapter I 211
  • Chapter II 225
  • Chapter II 234
  • Chapter II 236
  • Chapter II 239
  • Chapter II 255
  • Chapter II 271
  • Chapter II 284
  • Chapter II 301
  • Chapter X 309
  • Chapter XI 314
  • Explanatory Notes 325
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 342

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.