Madame Bovary: Life in a Country Town

By Gustave Flaubert; Gerard Hopkins | Go to book overview

In this way she managed to get his consent to her going to town once a week to see her lover.

After only a month she was indeed found to have made considerable progress.


CHAPTER V

IT was on Thursdays that she went into Rouen. On these occasions, she got up and dressed quietly so as not to wake Charles who might have made some comment about the time.

She would pace to and fro, stopping in front of the windows and looking down into the square. The early day would be filtering between the pillars of the market-hall, and in the pale light of dawn the capital letters which adorned the front of the chemist's shop (where all the shutters were closed) could be plainly seen.

When the clock marked a quarter-past seven, she would walk across to the Golden Lion. Artémise yawned as she unbolted the front-door and raked up the hot embers from under the ashes for her visitor's benefit. There was no one in the kitchen but Emma. From time to time she went out into the street. Hivert was harnessing the horses in leisurely fashion, listening the while to Madame Lefrançois who, with her night-capped head projecting from an upper window, was giving him a number of instructions and explanations which would have completely confused anybody else. Emma tapped with her foot on the flagstones of the yard. At last, having drunk a bowl of soup, he put on his driving coat, lit his pipe, grasped his whip, and took his seat on the box without any sign of hurry.

The Swallow started off at a hand-trot. In the course of the first quarter of a mile it made a succession of stops for the purpose of picking up passengers who were waiting at their garden gates. Those who had booked their places the night before kept it waiting. Some were still in bed. Hivert called to them by name, swore loudly, and finally, dismounting from his box, thundered on the panels of the door. The wind blew through the cracked screens of the diligence. At last, however, the four benches had their full complement, the vehicle rumbled off, and the long line of apple-trees slid slowly past. The road, flanked by ditches filled with yellow water, dwindled away to the distant horizon.

-239-

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Madame Bovary: Life in a Country Town
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • Select Bibliography xxi
  • A Chronology of Gustave Flaubert xxiii
  • Part One - Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 10
  • Chapter II 17
  • Chapter II 22
  • Chapter II 27
  • Chapter VI 31
  • Chapter VII 35
  • Chapter VII 41
  • Chapter VII 50
  • Part Two - Chapter I 61
  • Chapter II 69
  • Chapter II 75
  • Chapter II 85
  • Chapter II 89
  • Chapter VI 98
  • Chapter VII 110
  • Chapter VIII 117
  • Chapter VIII 138
  • Chapter VIII 148
  • Chapter VIII 156
  • Chapter XII 169
  • Chapter XIII 182
  • Chapter XIV 191
  • Chapter XIV 201
  • Part Three - Chapter I 211
  • Chapter I 211
  • Chapter II 225
  • Chapter II 234
  • Chapter II 236
  • Chapter II 239
  • Chapter II 255
  • Chapter II 271
  • Chapter II 284
  • Chapter II 301
  • Chapter X 309
  • Chapter XI 314
  • Explanatory Notes 325
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