Creating the Constitution: The Convention of 1787 and the First Congress

By Thornton Anderson | Go to book overview

The Delegates
BY STATE, FROM NORTH TO SOUTH, WITH THE
QUORUM EACH STATE REQUIRED
Attendance Attendance
NEW HAMPSHIRE (2) Jacob Broom 5-21 to end
c Nicholas Gilman 7-23 to end c John Dickinson 5-29 to 9-14
c John Langdon 7-23 to end d c George Read 5-19 to end
MASSACHUSETTS (3) MARYLAND (1)
n d c Elbridge Gerry* 5-29 to end c Daniel Carroll 7-9 to end
c Nathaniel Gorham 5-28 to end c Daniel of St. Thomas
c Rufus King 5-21 to endJenifer 6-2 to end
n Caleb Strong 5-28 to 8-17 c James McHenry* 5-28 to end
CONNECTICUT (1) n c Luther Martin* 6-9 to 9-3
n c Oliver Ellsworth 5-28 to 8-23 n c John Francis Mercer 8-6 to 8-17
c William Samuel Johnson 6-2 to end VIRGINIA (3)
d c Roger Sherman 5-30 to end John Blair 5-15 to end
NEW YORK (2) n James McClurg 5-15 to 7-26
c Alexander Hamilton* 5-18 to end c James Madison 5-14 to end
n c John Lansing, Jr. 6-2 to 7-10 n George Mason 5-17 to end
n Robert Yates 5-18 to 7-10 n c Edmund Randolph 5-15 to end
c George Washington 5-14 to end
NEW JERSEY (3) n d c George Wythe 5-15 to 6-4
David Brearley 5-25 to end
c Jonathan Dayton 6-21 to end NORTH CAROLINA (3)
n c William Churchill c William Blount* 620 to end
Houston 5-25 to 6-5 n William Richardson
c William Livingston* 6-5 to end Davie 5-23 to 8-12
William Paterson 5-25 to 7-23 n Alexander Martin 5-25 to 8-17
c Richard Dobbs Spaight 5-19 to end
PENNSYLVANIA (4) c Hugh Williamson 5-25 to end
d c George Clymer 5-28 to end SOUTH CAROLINA (2)
c Thomas Fitzsimons 5-25 to end c Pierce Butler 5-25 to end
d c Benjamin Franklin 5-28 to end c Charles Pinckney 5-17 to end
c Jared Ingersoll 5-28 to end Charles Cotesworth
c Thomas Mifflin 5-28 to end Pinckney 5-25 to end
c Gouverneur Morris* 5-25 to end c John Rutledge 5-17 to end
d c Robert Morris 5-25 to end
d c James Wilson 5-25 to end GEORGIA (2)
DELAWARE (3) c Abraham Baldwin 6-11 to end
Richard Bassett 5-21 to end c William Few* 5-19 to end
c Gunning Bedford, Jr. 5-28 to end n c William Houstoun 6-1 to 7-26
n c William Pierce 5-31 to 6-30
c present or former member of Congress
d signer of the Declaration of Independence
n nonsigner of the Constitution ( Gerry, Mason, and Randolph were present)
* Eight delegates had gaps in attendance: Blount 7-3 to 8-6; Few 6-30 to 8-6; Gerry 7-27 to
8-9; Hamilton 6-30 to 9-6, with occasional attendance; Livingston 7-3 to 7-19; L. Martin 7-
27 to 8-12, except 8-6; McHenry 6-1 to 8-6; and G. Morris 5-31 to 6-30. The Convention
did not meet 7-27 to 8-5, and ended 9-17-1787.

-xi-

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Creating the Constitution: The Convention of 1787 and the First Congress
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Contents vii
  • Convention Chronology ix
  • The Delegates xi
  • Preface xiii
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - Ideas from England 17
  • 3 - Political Motivations 43
  • 4 - Economic Motivations 85
  • 5 - An Anti-Demoscratic Convention? 117
  • 6 - The Convention Congress 173
  • Appendixes 207
  • Works Cited 239
  • Index 251
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