Games Advisors Play: Foreign Policy in the Nixon and Carter Administrations

By Jean A. Garrison | Go to book overview
Save to active project

5
Influence Patterns in a Contentious Political Environment

Developing Stalemate on SALT II

Policy differences, minimized early, became substantial in the latter half of the Carter administration and directly influenced the future of SALT II. In one typical example involving Cuba and the Soviets, Zbigniew Brzezinski and Cyrus Vance responded in opposite ways. When intelligence reports of Soviet MIG-23 aircraft in Cuba surfaced in early 1979, Brzezinski linked their presence in Cuba to Soviet revolutionary activities around the world.1 Vance, however, was not inclined to make that linkage: "Anything relating to the Soviet military role in Cuba is politically volatile in the United States. It is guaranteed to inflame domestic opinion and make sensible resolution difficult. I felt that unless we could close off the issue quickly and satisfactorily, it could set back U.S.-Soviet relations and present us with a major domestic problem."2Vance did not want regional flare-ups to stall progress on arms control negotiations and general U.S.-Soviet relations.

As noted earlier, deep cleavages among the principal advisors emerged during the second half of the administration and came to influence the future of SALT II. In the open advisory system, it became common knowledge that the collegial atmosphere had disappeared, being replaced by policy and turf battles. Essentially, this meant that the advisory system had a predisposition to conflict that left the president facing divergent opinions and influence tactics on the part of advisors, each of whom wanted to shape the policy agenda. In his memoirs, Anatoly Dobrynin reflected upon the president's difficulty in choosing among his advisors. To him, Carter's inability to give "consistent direction"

-100-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Games Advisors Play: Foreign Policy in the Nixon and Carter Administrations
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 198

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?