Responding to Defense Dependence: Policy Ideas and the American Defense Industrial Base

By Erik R. Pages | Go to book overview

6
Yet Another Call to Arms: Revitalizing the Bearings Industry

In addition to crises affecting the machine tool and semiconductor industries, the mid- 1980s also witnessed heightened concern in Washington about the condition of the U.S. ball and roller bearings industry. Such fears were not completely new as the competitiveness of this sector had long concerned defense planners. Government efforts to assist the industry on defense grounds date back to World War II and continued at intervals throughout the Cold War era. However, these efforts were ad hoc, and did not involve creation of a comprehensive government strategy for the bearings industry. Stimulated largely by recurrent crises in the industry, earlier government assistance efforts had done little to address the root causes of long-term decline.

By 1986, the situation facing the industry had worsened dramatically. A weakened bearings industry had now become enfeebled, forcing industry leaders to initiate a concerted push for government assistance. Working hand in hand with the Congressional Bearings Caucus and other supporters, the industry sought to follow the lobbying strategies employed by both the machine tool and semiconductor industries. Bearings lobbyists portrayed their industry as an essential building block for both national security and economic competitiveness. Without a government bailout, they argued, the United States would permanently lose this critical production capability. Given the importance of bearings to such critical military items as aircraft engines and heavy vehicles, the industry's decline could have profound repercussions for the U.S. defense posture.

While the bearing industry's strategy was similar to that employed by other sectors, bearing producers did not achieve similar results, Indeed, the push for a sector-specific industrial policy was a colossal failure. The only result of several years of effort was a limited Buy-American restriction enacted by Congress after several years of Pentagon delays.

-109-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Responding to Defense Dependence: Policy Ideas and the American Defense Industrial Base
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 191

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.