The American Slave: A Composite Autobiography - Vol. 5

By George P. Rawick | Go to book overview
B. E. Davis March 6, 1938
Madisonville, Texas (No)

Lizzie Grant

I was born in Dunbar, West Virginia, in 1847 and was owned by Ellis Grant, Cousin to General U. S. Grant.

My mother's name was Ella Grant. I do not know who my father was, as I was a stray colt and never was told who he was. I had only one sister that I knew of and her name was Sally. Our home life as slave children was hell.

Maser owned a plantation of 20 acres. Their home was a 2 room house built of rocks and covered with boards split out of logs by hand. The house had lots of shade trees and vines around it. Cowhides were hung over the doors to keep out the rain and cold. He only had 2 slaves which was me and my husband. Maser died of wounds he received in that awful war between the states.

I had a home wedding and Maser built us a one-room quarters and put me and my man together in it and we became man and wife. We had 9 children, 6 are still living in this country close by and trying to farm. I had 19 grandchildren the last time I counted them and one great grandchild.

My man died 30 years ago, and I'se never married again. I gets a few little odd jobs to do as my pension is not enough to live on. I am getting old and feeble and not able to do much work and have to buy lots of medicine to keep me going.

-1553-

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The American Slave: A Composite Autobiography - Vol. 5
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • THE AMERICAN SLAVE: A COMPOSITE AUTOBIOGRAPHY ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Texas 1439
  • Mary Gaffney 1441
  • Hattie Gates 1458
  • George Glasker 1500
  • Mother Goodman 1530
  • Lizzie Grant 1553
  • Lizzie Grant 1554
  • Lucendy Griffen 1607
  • Jeff Hamilton 1633
  • Alice Harwell 1665
  • Albert Henderson 1696
  • Lee Hobby 1739
  • William Irving 1864
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