The American Slave: A Composite Autobiography - Vol. 5

By George P. Rawick | Go to book overview
Mrs. Ada Davis, P.W. September 16, 1937
McLennan County, Texas (Yes)
Dist. #8

Jeff Hamilton

"I was born in the state of Kentucky, in 1840. I came to Texas when I was three years of age. My mother, Kitty McKem, and three sisters came with me. We came with a man by the name of McKem. We located in Fort Bend County, only stayed there a short time and moved to Mosco, Texas. We moved from Mosco, Texas, to Greenville, Texas, where we made one crop. The next year we moved to Old Sumster, county seat of Trinity County.

"Mr. McKem, my marster was not good to me nor to his own fambly. He would get drunk and run the entire fambly away from home, at times. Times were not good in Trinity County at that time, so he decided to sell me to get some needed cash. I was sold to General Sam Houston, in Trinity County, in 1852, for $450.00. I hated to leave my mother and sisters. The separation from them caused me to weep. General Sam Houston went in a store and bought me a new straw hat with a feather on the side, which I was very proud of. General Sam Houston was a member of Congress at that time. He served two years in Congress after he bought me. He ran again and was elected. I served him during the time he was Governor. We moved from Austin when General Sam Houston served out his term as Governor, to Chambers County on the Galveston Bay. We made one crop there and sold it to the landlord before it was harvested. We then moved back to Huntsville, where he lived on the farm until he died. My work was to 'tend to General Sam Houston and herd sheep. The General was very kind to me. He allowed me to live in the house with him and keep fires burning all night. I wore good common

-1633-

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The American Slave: A Composite Autobiography - Vol. 5
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • THE AMERICAN SLAVE: A COMPOSITE AUTOBIOGRAPHY ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Texas 1439
  • Mary Gaffney 1441
  • Hattie Gates 1458
  • George Glasker 1500
  • Mother Goodman 1530
  • Lizzie Grant 1553
  • Lizzie Grant 1554
  • Lucendy Griffen 1607
  • Jeff Hamilton 1633
  • Alice Harwell 1665
  • Albert Henderson 1696
  • Lee Hobby 1739
  • William Irving 1864
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