European Treaties Bearing on the History of the United States and Its Dependencies to 1648

By Frances Gardiner Davenport | Go to book overview

18.
Treaty concluded between France and Spain, at Crépy-enLaonnois, September 18, 1544; separate article relating to the Indies, signed by the plenipotentiaries of France on the same day.

INTRODUCTION.

Among the articles considered by the Emperor at the end of November, 1537, in connection with the instructions to his ministers, Cobos and Granvelle, for treating with Montmorency, the grand master of France, the following was included: "Whether some article ought not to be introduced concerning the Indies, to prevent King Francis from undertaking anything in that quarter?"2 In the truce of Nice ( June 18, 1538), which was the fruit of these negotiations, no reference to the Indies, however, appears to have been made.3

In July, 1542, the King of France, Francis I., irritated by the Emperor's action in respect to the Milanese, broke the truce of Nice by declaring war against him. Francis had as allies the Turks and some of the minor European powers; the Emperor formed an alliance with Henry VIII. of England. Both the last-named allies invaded France, and the Emperor terrified Paris by his successful siege of Saint-Dizier (July 5-August 25) and his subsequent march toward the capital. While the siege of Saint-Dizier was in progress, Francis made overtures of peace. From August 29, there were frequent conferences, at which France was represented by the Admiral d'Annebaut, Gilbert Bayard, secretary of state, and Erraut de Chemans, keeper of the seals, whose place was soon taken by Charles de Neuilly, master of requests. The Emperor's representatives were his chancellor, Nicolas Perrenot, sieur de, Granvelle, Ferrante Gonzaga, viceroy of Sicily, Antoine Perrenot, bishop of Arras, and Alonso de Idiaquez, one of the Emperor's secretaries.4 At Crépy

____________________
1
This is the date and place as given in the treaty. Some have maintained that it was concluded a day or two earlier at Soissons, or that it was signed as late as Sept. 19. Cf. Cal. St. Pap., Spain, 1544, vol. VII., pp. xxvii, 348; Gachard, Trois Années, p. 62; Paillard, L'Invasion Allemande, pp. 391 ff., 412 ff. The text of the treaty of peace is printed in F. Leonard, Recueil des Traitez ( 1693), II. 430 ff., and in J. Dumont, Corps Diplomatique ( 1726- 1731), tom. IV., pt. II., pp. 279 ff.
2
Cal. St. Pap., Spain 1536- 1538, p. 407. "Sy se tractara y articulara alguna cosa tocante a las Indias, a fin que el dicho Rey de Francia no emprenda de aqui adelante algo en perjuyzio de Su Magestad." British Museum Add. MSS., 28590, f. 27.
3
The text of the truce is in Leonard, op. cit., II. 407 ff. For its effect on depredations by the French in the West Indies, see La Roncière, La Marine Française, III. 296.
4
Gachard, Trois Années, pp. 54 ff.; Paillard, L'Invasion Allemande, pp. 366 ff.

-205-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
European Treaties Bearing on the History of the United States and Its Dependencies to 1648
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 388

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.