European Treaties Bearing on the History of the United States and Its Dependencies to 1648

By Frances Gardiner Davenport | Go to book overview

believed that "the clause should be accepted with some modifications, and that trade should be permitted".14 The objection of the councils was based on the opinion that the contemplated permission to trade would make trouble, because the French would not trade in accordance with regulations. The Council of the Indies urged that in this, as in former treaties, matters pertaining to the Indies should not be mentioned at all. If, however, the French were permitted to trade, they should be held to the laws prohibiting the removal of gold and silver from territory subject to Castile, even in exchange for merchandise, and their homeward-bound ships should be obliged to touch at Cadiz or San Lucar.15 The King of Portugal also objected to the article, declaring that the French went in armed ships not only for the purpose of trading, but in order to rob with more security.16 Doubtless on account of the strong opposition, the article, as would appear, was never duly ratified; and in 1545, in accordance with the Emperor's demand, Francis I. forbade his subjects to go to the oversea possessions of Spain.17


BIBLIOGRAPHY.

Text: MS. The original of the article relating to the Indies, printed below, it is believed for the first time, is in the Archives of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Paris, Mémoires et Documents, Espagne, vol. 306, f. 196.

____________________
14
Cal. St. Pop., Spain, 1544, vol. VII., pp. 495-496.
15
The opinions of the councils are given in a document in the Archives of the Indies, Patronato, 2-5-1/26, ramo 1. The opinion of the Council of the Indies is as follows: "Paresce al Consejo que pot algunos inconvinientes que se seguiran de la contractaçion de los Françeses en las Indias, fuera mas servyçio de Su Magestad, que en estas pazes no se tractara en las cosas de las Indias mas que en las pazes y capitulaciones hasta qui hechas, y que se guardara en esto lo que siempre se ha hecho, que los Franceses no fueran a contratar a Ins Indias, como nunca havian ydo, sin hazer sobresto nuevo asiento, y que esto quedara con la costumbre muy usada, que ha havido desde el tiempo del descubrimiento y publicacion de las Indias, de no passar a ellas Franceses. Pero sy los negocios vinieron a terminos que se sospechava, que aunque con estos reynos hoviera paz, el Rey de Francia y sus subditos molestaran e hizieran daño a las Indias, y que para assentar bien las cosas dellas, no se pudo, o no se puede, dexar de conçeder este capitulo que se ha visto en consejo, en tal caso, pot lo que conviene la paz a las Indias, paresçe que se puede sufrir lo tractado en el capitulo con tanto que entienda el Rey de Françia que sus sutditos que fueren a contratar a Ins Indias, han de guardar en todo las leyes y prematicas que ellos mismos y los Ingleses y Portugueses y vassallos de qualquier reyno estraño guardan en estos reynos de Castilla y de Leon, de cuya corona son las Indias, quando vienen a contratar en ellos; en as quales entre otras cosas se dispone que ningunos mercaderes ny otras personas, estrangeros ny naturales, no puedan sacar de los reynos de Castilla oro ny plata, en pasta ny en moneda ny vellon, aunque lo ayan habido en precio y pago de las mercaderias que a ellos traen, pot que si en retorno de sus mercaderias hoviesen de sacar oro o plata, era enriqueçer el reyno de Françia y enpobrecer estos reynos, y sy con esto se pudiese tractar que los navios Françeses a la buelta de las Indias fuesen obligados a tocar en Caliz o en Sanlucar, y manifestar lo que traen ally, escusar seyan algunos inconvinientes que se temen desta contractaçion y ellos no rodeavan mucho en su viage."
16
Santarem, Quadro Elementar, III. 308-309.
17
La Roncière, op. cit., III. 302, 303.

-207-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
European Treaties Bearing on the History of the United States and Its Dependencies to 1648
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 388

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.