European Treaties Bearing on the History of the United States and Its Dependencies to 1648

By Frances Gardiner Davenport | Go to book overview

however, appeared in an act signed by the French and English ambassadors, which certified that the archdukes' deputies had agreed that just as the Dutch should not traffic in places held by the King of Spain in the Indies without his permission, so subjects of the King of Spain should not traffic in places held by the States in the Indies without their permission; and secondly, that the States' deputies had declared that if their native allies in the Indies were molested, they would aid them, and that such action should not be a violation of the truce.

Other principal points of dispute were adjusted as follows: the independence of the States was acknowledged; the exercise of the Catholic religion in the Provinces was not conceded; the States were left in enjoyment of the places that they occupied in Brabant and Flanders; and they kept a tax on vessels passing through the Scheldt to Antwerp.

Toward the middle of March, after the success of the negotiations had become assured, Jeannin acquainted the States General with what had passed in the conferences at Antwerp, and with the articles as agreed to by the deputies of the archdukes, persuaded them suitably to recognize the services of Prince Maurice and of his house,26 and promised that if Spain disturbed the India commerce the kings of France and England would deem it a rupture of the truce.27 Toward the end of the month, the deputies of the States General, who with one exception28 were the same as those of the preceding year, met with the deputies of the kings and of the archdukes at Antwerp, and on the ninth of April the treaty and the additional acts were signed in that city. They were ratified a few days later by the States General at Bergen-op-Zoom, and by the archdukes, and after an interval of three months by the King of Spain, who added that he hoped that during the truce the States would treat the Catholics well.29


BIBLIOGRAPHY.

Text: MS. The original manuscript of the ratification by the King of Spain is in the Rijksarchief at the Hague, Secrete Casse, Spaignen en de Ertzhertogen, casse B, loquet A, no. 24.

Text: Printed. French. Authorized editions were issued by Velpius in Brussels and by Jacobsz in the Hague in 1609. They do not include the secret treaty and the ambassadors' certificates, which are published together with the text in P. Jeannin, Négociations ( 1st ed., 1656; in Petitot, Collection des Mémoires, toms. XI-XV., 1821- 1822, V. 365-383), and thence in J. Dumont, Corps Diplomatique ( 1726- 1731), tom. V., pt. II., pp. 99-102, and in J. A. de Abreu y Bertodano, Coleccion de los Tratados de España: Reynado de Phelipe III. ( 1740), I. 458-489. A

____________________
26
Ibid., pp. 292-303, 305, 310, 311.
27
Grotius, op. cit., lib. XVIII.; Jeannin, op. cit., V. 302.
28
Cornelius Renessen was substituted for Nicholas Berk, deputy for Utrecht.
29
See below, p. 267.

-263-

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