European Treaties Bearing on the History of the United States and Its Dependencies to 1648

By Frances Gardiner Davenport | Go to book overview

31.
Recess signed by the Commissioners of Denmark and the United Netherlands at Bremen, September 30/October 10, 1621.

INTRODUCTION.

The conference stipulated by the eighth article of the treaty of the Hague1 was held at Bremen in August and September, 1621, between the Danish commissioners, Jacob Ulfeldt and Holger Rosenkrantz, and the Dutch commissioners, led by Reinier Pauw of Holland. The principal subjects of discussion were (1) reciprocal financial aid, and (2) trade relations in Europe and in both Indies.

The instructions2 to be followed by the Dutch commissioners, in case the Danes introduced the question of the Indian trade, distinguished between the East and West Indies. With reference to the East Indies, the commissioners were to declare that neutral lands were open to Danish traders, but that places fortified by the Dutch East India Company, or districts in which the company had treaty rights, were closed to the Danes, as to all others. With reference to the West Indies, the commissioners were to urge that the King of Denmark and his subjects might, like anyone else, take shares in the recently formed Dutch West India Company, and thus participate in directing its policy. The article finally agreed to--which differed somewhat from the

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Doc. 30.
2
The instructions are preserved in the Ryksarchief at the Hague and have the same pressmark as the text. The paragraph concerning the West Indies is as follows:

"Ende wat aengaet de handelinge oft traficque op West-Indien, alsoo Hare Ho: Mo: goetgevonden hebben deselve te begrijpen in eene generale compaignie, die volgende het octroy daertoe verleent, hier te lande werdt opgerecht, in welcke generale compaignie een yeder vrijstaet soodanige capitalen ende sommen van penningen te participeren als hem goetduncken sal, soo ist hoochstgedachte Sijne Ma[jestei]t ende desselffs ondersaten oock vrij ende open daerinne soo veel te herederen, als deselve geraden sullen mogen vinden. Sullende Sijne Ma[jesteit] ende desselffs ondersaten oock behoorlijck erkent ende geaccommodeert werden inde kennisse, directie, ende 't beleyt der saecken, sulcx ende in conformité als 't voorsz. octroy daarvan is medebrengende oft anderssints soo men in tijden ende wijlen opt selve stuck metten anderen naerder sal connen overeencomen ende verdragen."

Translation: "And as to that which concerns commerce or trade to the West Indies since their High Mightinesses have consented to comprehend the same in a general company, which, in accordance with the charter granted thereto, has been erected in this country, in which general Company each free state shall hold as much capital and money as it shall think good--so his abovementioned Majesty and his subjects are also free to invest as much therein as they shall find convenient. His Majesty and subjects would also be suitably recognized and received into the knowledge, direction, and management of affairs, like and according as the aforesaid charter requires, or otherwise as at the time it shall be possible mutually to agree and contract."

-280-

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