European Treaties Bearing on the History of the United States and Its Dependencies to 1648

By Frances Gardiner Davenport | Go to book overview
Save to active project

39.
Agreement concluded between the Governor of Massachusetts and the Commissioner of the Governor of Acadia, at Boston, October 8, 1644. Ratification by the Commissioners of the United Colonies, September 2, 1645. [Ratification by D'Aulnay, September 28, 1646.]

INTRODUCTION.

The treaty of St. Germain,1 which restored Canada and Acadia to France, did not define the boundaries of those regions. The French government, however, appears to have ordered the newly appointed governor of Acadia, the Commandeur De Razilly, to clear the coast of the English as far as Pemaquid.2 In accordance with this alleged order, in 1633, one of De Razilly's lieutenants, La Tour, "displanted" the English from their "trading house" at Machias;3 and in 1635 De Razilly's other lieutenant, D'Aulnay, seized the fortified trading post at Penobscot4 (Pentagoet), which in 1630, two years after it was captured from the French by Kirke,5 had been taken over by the Plymouth colonists.6

The Plymouth colony, planning to recover Penobscot by force of arms, desired help from Massachusetts.7 Though at first inclined to co-operate, Massachusetts ultimately refused. Governor Winthrop was anxious to avoid difficulties with the French government, partly, no doubt, lest these should lead to interference by England in the management of New England's relations with the adjacent settlements of the French and Dutch. Such interference had, indeed, been recently threatened.8 But although Winthrop

____________________
1
Doc. 36.
2
Mass. Hist. Soc., Collections, 3d ser., VII. 94; Winthrop's Journal (ed. Hosmer), I. 157,201.
3
Winthrop's Journal (ed. cit.), I. 113; Bradford, History of Plymouth Plantation (ed. Mass. Hist. Soc., II. 133, and note; ed. Davis, p. 284).
4
Bradford, op. cit. (ed. Mass. Hist. Soc., II. 206, 207; ed. Davis, P. 318) ; Winthrop, ed. cit., I. 157.
5
Report on Canadian Archives, 1894 (ed. Brymner), p. ix; N. Denys, Description and Natural History of the Coasts of North America (ed. W. F. Ganong, for the Champlain SOC., 1908), p. 98.
6
Bradford, op. cit. (ed. Mass. Hist. Soc., II. 80-87; ed. Davis, pp. 254-259).
7
Bradford, op. cit. (ed. Mass. Hist. Sac., II. 211-214, and notes; ed. Davis, pp. 320- 321); Winthrop, ed. cit., I. 159.
8
By the "Commission for Regulating Plantations" , 1634, the commissioners were empowered to make laws and ordinances concerning the demeanor of the colonies "towards foreign princes and their people". Bradford, op. cit. (ed. Mass. Hist. Soc., II. 184; ed. Davis, p. 416).

-347-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
European Treaties Bearing on the History of the United States and Its Dependencies to 1648
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 388

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?