The Republic and The Laws

By Cicero; Niall Rudd | Go to book overview

TABLE OF DATES (BC)
753 Traditional date for foundation of Rome
509 Expulsion of Tarquinius Superbus
494-440 Struggle of the Orders (i.e. between patrician and plebeian
families)
450 Publication of the Twelve Tables (the earliest code of Roman
law, framed by a Committee of Ten; see R. 2. 61-3; L. 1.
17)
340-264 Roman expansion in Italy
264-241 First Punic War
218-202 Second Punic War
202 Scipio defeats Hannibal at Zama in North Africa
197-133 Operations in Spain
185 Birth of Scipio Aemilianus
167 Polybius, the Greek historian, is brought to Rome
155 Carneades the Sceptic comes to Rome
149-146 Third Punic War
146 Carthage sacked by Scipio Aemilianus
144 The Stoic Panaetius comes to Rome
133 The tribunate and death of Tiberius Gracchus
Scipio Aemilianus captures Numantia in Spain
129 Death of Scipio Aemilianus
123-122 The tribunates and death of Gaius Gracchus
106 Marius defeats Jugurtha in North Africa
Birth of Cicero
102-101 Marius defeats the Teutones and Cimbri
98-91 War between Rome and her Italian Allies
87 Cicero studies with the Sceptic Philo of Larissa in Rome
82-80 Dictatorship of Sulla
78 Cicero studies philosophy in Athens with Antiochus of Ascalon
63 Cicero consul; Catiline's insurrection crushed
61 Trial and acquittal of Clodius
60 The so-called 'First Triumvirate' of Pompey, Caesar, and
Crassus
58 Cicero goes into exile
57 Cicero returns
54-52 Cicero writing the Republic
53 Cicero becomes an augur

-xlii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Republic and The Laws
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • OXFORD WORLD'S CLASSICS i
  • OXFORD WORLD'S CLASSICS ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Abbreviations viii
  • Introduction ix
  • NOTE ON THE TEXT xxxii
  • NOTE ON THE TRANSLATION xxxiv
  • Bibliography xxxvi
  • TABLE OF DATES (BC) xlii
  • THE REPUBLIC 1
  • Book 1 3
  • Book 2 35
  • Book 3 60
  • Book 4 76
  • Book 5 81
  • Book 6 85
  • THE LAWS 95
  • Book 1 97
  • Book 2 121
  • Book 3 150
  • APPENDIX NOTES ON THE ROMAN CONSTITUTION 170
  • EXPLANATORY NOTES 175
  • INDEX OF NAMES 222
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 244

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.