The Republic and The Laws

By Cicero; Niall Rudd | Go to book overview

BOOK 4

Education

[According to Lactantius ( De Opificio Dei 1. 11-13) Cicero touched on the relation of mind (or soul) to body in Book 4. Fragments which seem to belong to that topic are usually placed at the beginning to serve as an introduction to the theme of education. The book is in a pitiful state; the Vatican manuscript contains just parts of sections 2-4.]

. . . and the very mind that envisages the future recalls the past . . . ( Nonius, 3. 803).

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. . . If it is true that everybody would sooner die than be turned into some form of animal (even though he retained a human mind), how much more awful it would be to have a human body and the mind of a wild beast! In my view the latter fate would be worse to the degree that the mind is nobler than the body . . . ( Lactantius, Divinae Institutiones 5. 11. 2).

. . . He did not think, he said, that what was good for a ram was also good for Publius Africanus . . . ( Augustine, Contra lulianum 4. 12. 59).

SCIPIO: . . . How efficiently the orders are arranged on the basis of age and property! For voting purposes the senate is counted along with the knights. Too many people now, in their folly, want to get rid of this admirable system; they advocate a new distribution of wealth through some resolution of the plebs whereby senators would have to resign their equestrian status.

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3-8. A critique of Greek customs

Consider now how wisely provision has been made for that partnership of citizens in a happy and honourable life. For that is the primary purpose of forming a community, and that must be achieved for human beings by the state, partly through its institutions and partly through its laws. First, with regard to the training of free-born boys--an area in which the Greeks have worked hard to no avail and in which alone, according to our guest

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The Republic and The Laws
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • OXFORD WORLD'S CLASSICS i
  • OXFORD WORLD'S CLASSICS ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Abbreviations viii
  • Introduction ix
  • NOTE ON THE TEXT xxxii
  • NOTE ON THE TRANSLATION xxxiv
  • Bibliography xxxvi
  • TABLE OF DATES (BC) xlii
  • THE REPUBLIC 1
  • Book 1 3
  • Book 2 35
  • Book 3 60
  • Book 4 76
  • Book 5 81
  • Book 6 85
  • THE LAWS 95
  • Book 1 97
  • Book 2 121
  • Book 3 150
  • APPENDIX NOTES ON THE ROMAN CONSTITUTION 170
  • EXPLANATORY NOTES 175
  • INDEX OF NAMES 222
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