The Republic and The Laws

By Cicero; Niall Rudd | Go to book overview

BOOK 6

1-2. The problem of political control

So you are waiting to hear about the ruler's prudence in all its facets--a quality that takes its very name from 'pro-vision' [seeing ahead] ( Nonius 1. 60).

1

Accordingly this citizen must make sure that he is always forearmed against the things that upset the stability of the state ( Nonius 2. 389).

. . . and such dissension among citizens is called 'sedition', because people 'go apart' [se + itio] to different factions ( Nonius 1. 36 and Servius on Virgil, Aeneid 1. 149).

. . . and in times of civil conflict, when soundness is more important than numbers, I think citizens should be assessed rather than counted ( Nonius 3. 836).

For our lusts are set over our thoughts like cruel mistresses, ordering and compelling us to do outlandish things. As there is no way in which they may be appeased or satisfied, once they have inflamed a person with their seductive charms they drive him to every sort of crime ( Nonius 3. 686).

. . . whoever crushes its [i.e. the seditious mob's] force and its rampant ferocity . . . ( Nonius 3. 789).

This act was the more remarkable in that, although the two colleagues were in the same position, they were not equally disliked; more than that, the affection felt for Gracchus* actually mitigated Claudius' unpopularity ( Gellius 7. 16. 11, Nonius 2. 448).

2

The result was that, as this writer* points out, a thousand men went down to the forum every day wearing purple-dyed cloaks . . . ( Nonius 3. 805).

In their case, as you recall, a crowd of the least substantial citizens got together, and thanks to the coins which they contributed a funeral was, quite unexpectedly, provided ( Nonius 3. 833).

. . . for our ancestors were keen that marriages should be built on solid foundations ( Nonius 3. 824, Priscian, Gramm. Lat. K. 3. 70. 11).

Laelius' speech,* with which we are all familiar, 〈points out〉

-85-

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The Republic and The Laws
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • OXFORD WORLD'S CLASSICS i
  • OXFORD WORLD'S CLASSICS ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Abbreviations viii
  • Introduction ix
  • NOTE ON THE TEXT xxxii
  • NOTE ON THE TRANSLATION xxxiv
  • Bibliography xxxvi
  • TABLE OF DATES (BC) xlii
  • THE REPUBLIC 1
  • Book 1 3
  • Book 2 35
  • Book 3 60
  • Book 4 76
  • Book 5 81
  • Book 6 85
  • THE LAWS 95
  • Book 1 97
  • Book 2 121
  • Book 3 150
  • APPENDIX NOTES ON THE ROMAN CONSTITUTION 170
  • EXPLANATORY NOTES 175
  • INDEX OF NAMES 222
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