Elements of Socialism: A Text-Book

By John Spargo; George Louis Arner | Go to book overview

SUMMARY
1. Socialists generally have from the first included immediate reforms in their program, but there has always been a minority opposed to reforms, and basing their hope of revolution upon the increasing misery of the proletariat.
2. As the movement in any country becomes stronger there is an increasing tendency to advocate reforms and an increasing recognition of the value of parliamentary activity.
3. The attitude of Socialist parties toward trade unionism is often characterized at first by a desire to control, and failing in this, by open hostility. In later stages the attitude tends to be that of recognition and desire for coöperation with the unions.
4. The aim of all Socialist reform measures is the strengthening of the workers as a class, economically and politically.

QUESTIONS
1. Discuss the attitude of Marx and Engels toward reforms.
2. What is the distinction between Revolutionism and Opportunism?
3. What is the attitude of the extreme Revolutionist toward parliamentary activity?
4. What changes have taken place in the tactics of the German Social Democracy since the early period of its history?
5. Explain the relation of Social reform to the class struggle.
6. How does the attitude of the British Socialists toward distributive coöperation differ from that of the Belgians?
7. What has been the attitude of the Social Democrats in England toward the trade unions?
8. What is the difference in attitude toward trade unions between the American Socialist and Socialist Labor Parties?
9. Under what circumstances will Socialists work with non-Socialist reformers?
10. Why do Socialists sometimes refuse to work with such reformers?

LITERATURE

Commons J. R. and others (editors), Documentary History of American Industrial Society, Vol. V.

Ely R. T., The Labor Movement in America.

Holyoake G. J., History of Coöperation, Vol. I.

Hughan Jessie W., American Socialism of the Present Day, Chap. XI-XIV inclusive.

Kampffmeyer Paul, Changes in the Theory and Tactics of the (German) Social Democracy.

Marx K., and Engels F., The Communist Manifesto.

Spargo John, Karl Marx, His Life and Work, Chap. X.

Webb, Sidney and Beatrice, History of Trade Unionism, Chap. I and II.

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