Elementary Experiments in Psychology

By Carl E. Seashore | Go to book overview

INTRODUCTION

To the Student:

PSYCHOLOGY is a systematic study of mental life. You now turn from the study of physical forces, rocks, flowers, and animal tissues, in nature without, to a study of your own mind. You are to perform experiments upon yourself.

The experimental method enables you to analyze and reduce a mental process to its simplest elements; to control, repeat, and vary the conditions systematically; to record the results; to trace interrelations and explanations of known phenomena; and to discover new facts and problems.

This manual is so arranged as to furnish set exercises in which directions, aids, and explanations are given in the order needed. Only a few of the most general suggestions for your guidance need be given here.

Finish as you go along. The paragraph is the unit; always read a paragraph at a time and perform the experiment, write the report, or master the explanation before you read the next. This is mandatory, because glancing ahead would often vitiate the experiment.

Take systematic notes. The directions for notes are specific in certain minimum requirements. These notes are not primarily for the information of the instructor, or for reviews and examinations, but for the purpose

-ix-

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Elementary Experiments in Psychology
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Chapter I Visual After-Images 1
  • Chapter II Visual Contrast 13
  • Chapter III the Visual Field 23
  • Chapter IV Visual Space 39
  • Chapter V Auditory Space 55
  • Chapter VI Tactual Space 71
  • Chapter VII Cutaneous Sensations 82
  • Chapter VIII Weber's Law 91
  • Chapter IX Mental Images 104
  • Chapter X Association 118
  • Chapter XI Memory 131
  • Chapter XII Apperception 144
  • Chapter XIII Attention 158
  • Chapter XIV Normal Illusions 172
  • Chapter XV Affective Tone 191
  • Chapter XVI Reation-Time 205
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