Elementary Experiments in Psychology

By Carl E. Seashore | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IX
MENTAL IMAGES

For One.

THE problem is to determine the capacity for vividness of mental images. In perception, which we have studied so far, the object is present to sense. We see the color, hear the sound, feel the cold point, etc.; that is, we refer the mental picture to its object. In memory, imagination, and the various stages of thinking, the object is not present, but the mental picture is present as in perception, although usually less integral, less vivid, less enduring, and less distinct. This mental picture which re-presents the object is the mental image.*

To illustrate the fact of imagery, recall your breakfast-table as you sat down to it this morning. What is it that you recall? Is it merely the names for things and qualities, or is it their images? The whiteness of the china and the linen, the brightness of the silver, the form of the sugar-bowl, the taste, the odor, the temperature, and the hardness or softness of the cereal,--how

____________________
*
"Images, along with sensations, constitute the materials of all intellectual operations; memory, reasoning, imagination, are acts which consist of grouping and coördinating images, in apprehending the relations already formed between them, and in reuniting them into new relations." (Binet.)

-104-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Elementary Experiments in Psychology
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Chapter I Visual After-Images 1
  • Chapter II Visual Contrast 13
  • Chapter III the Visual Field 23
  • Chapter IV Visual Space 39
  • Chapter V Auditory Space 55
  • Chapter VI Tactual Space 71
  • Chapter VII Cutaneous Sensations 82
  • Chapter VIII Weber's Law 91
  • Chapter IX Mental Images 104
  • Chapter X Association 118
  • Chapter XI Memory 131
  • Chapter XII Apperception 144
  • Chapter XIII Attention 158
  • Chapter XIV Normal Illusions 172
  • Chapter XV Affective Tone 191
  • Chapter XVI Reation-Time 205
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 218

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.