Higher Education for Business

By Robert Aaron Gordon; James Edwin Howell | Go to book overview

PREFACE

THIS REPORT embodies the results of a three-year study of collegiate business education which was undertaken at the request of The Ford Foundation. Our concern is with education for business at the college or university level, primarily although not exclusively as it is offered by university schools of business administration. This report does not deal with commercial education in the secondary schools or with the proprietary "business colleges."

One token of the widespread interest in collegiate business education is offered by the fact that surveys of the subject were commissioned almost simultaneously by two major national foundations. The other survey was undertaken by Professor Frank C. Pierson of Swarthmore College at the request of The Carnegie Corporation. Both surveys were carried on during the same period, and the two reports are scheduled for publication at about the same time.

We are happy to express our appreciation to Professor Pierson for his unstinted cooperation at all stages of the two studies. While some duplication was unavoidable, there has been a division of labor between the two projects, and he and we have provided for an exchange of information. It need hardly be added that, except for consultation in the early planning stage and the exchange of information, the two studies have been conducted entirely independently.

It would take many pages to list the names of all the persons and organizations that have helped us in the course of this study. We take this opportunity to express our thanks to all of them. During the course of this investigation we have talked to more than a thousand businessmen and educators, and they have all generously supplied us with information and counsel where they could.

We are particularly grateful to the deans of the business schools that we visited. Without exception, they patiently tried to answer our innumerable questions and courteously arranged for us the interviews we sought with members of their faculties and with representatives of the university administration. We owe a similar debt of thanks to the officials of about 100 companies who gave generously of their time when we

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Higher Education for Business
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 494

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.