Higher Education for Business

By Robert Aaron Gordon; James Edwin Howell | Go to book overview

chapter 12
NONDEGREE PROGRAMS FOR BUSINESSMEN

THROUGHOUT this report, we have stressed the fact that education for business competence is a continuing process that should extend throughout the businessman's career. The demand for formal business education is not confined merely to those who look forward to future business careers; those already in business also need additional education and training.

The demand by practicing businessmen for further educational help has expanded greatly since the Second World War.1 Of the several million businessmen in the United States, there are few who cannot benefit from additional education and training; and the number who currently seek such educational help, in one form or another, exceeds the number of students enrolled in the full-time degree programs in the business schools. As Clark and Sloan have put it, education has "come into its own, not only as a prerequisite to an industrial career, but as a continuous adjunct to it."2 The need for further education and training is felt at all levels of business.

This demand for continuing business education is met from several sources: individual employers, trade associations and other business supported groups, the public school systems through their adult education activities, and the colleges and universities. The educational activities of business itself--as represented both by in-company programs and those conducted by other business groups--constitute an educational phenomenon of the first magnitude. Despite their unquestioned importance, however, we shall not consider in this chapter the programs conducted by business itself, nor shall we be concerned with the adult education provided by public school systems, including the community colleges. We shall confine ourselves to the nondegree educational activities of the

____________________
1
For a discussion of a comparable development in England, see D. K. Clarke, "A Survey of Management Education in the United Kingdom," Journal of Industrial Economics, IV ( February, 1956),95-106.
2
H. F. Clark and H. S. Sloan, Classrooms in the Factories ( 1958), pp.11-12.

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