Higher Education for Business

By Robert Aaron Gordon; James Edwin Howell | Go to book overview

chapter 17
DOCTORAL PROGRAMS IN BUSINESS

THERE ARE about two dozen active doctoral programs in business in the United States.1 These programs have a critical role to play in the future of collegiate business education because, as we saw in Chapter 14, they constitute the most important source of supply of future college teachers of business administration. Thus far, however, the flow of doctorates in business has been quite small--an average of less than a hundred degrees per year during the last decade.

Table 22 indicates that there is a substantial amount of concentration of doctoral work and that a handful of universities account for the bulk of the doctor's degrees awarded in business. Recently a number of schools have instituted work for the doctorate or have revised and expanded programs that they already had, and several other schools are likely to inaugurate doctoral programs in the near future. Clearly, the number of programs will continue to grow, but it is equally clear that the bulk of each year's graduates will come from relatively few schools.


Objectives of the Doctoral Program

Doctoral programs are ordinarily viewed as preparing students for careers in either teaching or research. As others have noted, however, this is an overly sharp distinction. We stressed the point in earlier chapters that every college teacher should be also a scholar, even if he does not publish. In addition, it usually happens that those who formally carry on research, at least in the universities, also teach, although it is true that holders of the doctorate may have research careers in government or business or, as sometimes happens, move into administrative positions that make some use of their technical training.

Quantitatively, the greatest need is for well trained and scholarly col

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There are perhaps a dozen more that either are relatively inactive (with virtually no graduates in recent years), are so new that they have yet to award their first degrees, or are programs which, while permitting the study of business fields, are officially offered in the economics department.

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