Higher Education for Business

By Robert Aaron Gordon; James Edwin Howell | Go to book overview

appendix A
THE LITERATURE ON PERSONAL QUALITIES CONTRIBUTING TO BUSINESS SUCCESS
IN the first part of Chapter 5 we attempted to summarize the relevant literature bearing on the personal qualities which are presumably important for success in business. This appendix describes in more detail than was possible in Chapter 5 the studies which we consulted.The list of qualities presented on page 78 was derived from a study of the books and articles listed below. Those which were found most useful are indicated by an asterisk. The attempt to collate the findings of a number of disparate studies--each using different premises, each surveying a different group, and each using different procedures--raises the problem of constructing a common set of categories into which the qualities listed by each author can be placed. We attempted to fit the findings of each author into the framework we used in interviewing business firms on the qualities they felt were important for success in business management. This necessitated combining overlapping categories in several of the studies. The list presented on page 78 represents the qualities which were most often emphasized by the authors cited below.
* Bach G. L. "Where Do Executives Come From?" Personel, XXIX ( July, 1952), 51.
Bowen Howard R. "Future of Business Education," in The Challenge of Business Education. Chicago, University of Chicago Press, 1949. Pages 36-44.
* Calkins Robert D. "Objectives of Business Education," Harvard Business Review, xxv (Autumn, 1946), 46-57.
Cleeton Glen U., and Charles W. Mason. Executive Ability. Yellow Springs, Ohio, The Antioch Press, 1946. Page 26.
* Endicott Frank S. "Employment Trends in 1955," Journal of College Placement, xv ( March, 1955), 41-51.
Gardner Burleigh B. "What Makes Successful and Unsuccessful Ex"

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