Higher Education for Business

By Robert Aaron Gordon; James Edwin Howell | Go to book overview
Save to active project

appendix D
TECHNICAL NOTES TO TABLES IN CHAPTER 2

THE DATA on business degrees in Table 1 are from a work sheet prepared for this study by the Research and Statistical Services Branch of the U.S. Office of Education. We are indebted to Mrs. Mabel C. Rice, Supervisor of the Statistical Services Section, for her cooperation in making these data available to us. These data refer to the aggregate United States (continental United States plus outlying parts) for all years except 1939- 1940, 1941-1942, and 1943-1944, when they refer to the Continental United States. Data on degrees were not collected by field in 1945-1946.

The figures for "all fields" in Table 1 are from Biennial Survey of Education and Earned Degrees Conferred by Higher Educational Institutions (annual), both published by the United States Office of Education. These data refer to the Continental United States only. The limitations of the basic series have made it impossible to eliminate discrepancies between the series on degrees in business and in all fields which arise from differences in the geographical area covered. We believe, however, that these discrepancies are of minor importance.

Prior to 1931-1932 the estimates of business degree do not include any degrees conferred by teacher training institutions. From 1931-1932 through 1954-1955 degrees in business conferred by teacher training institutions are included in the estimates. The business degrees conferred by teacher training institutions from 1931-1932 through 1954-1955 must include (in addition to "legitimate" degrees in business administration and commerce) some degrees in the field of business education. Only in 1955-1956 and 1956-1957 does the reporting form specifically identify degrees in business education (as opposed to business administration) and indicate that they are to be counted as degrees in education, not business. For the period 1931-1932 through 1954-1955 the decision on how to classify business degrees in teacher training institutions was left to the responding institutions; therefore some business education degrees must be included in the totals. This fact may account for some part of the decline in the percentage of business to all degrees from 1954-1955 to 1955- 1956 shown in Table 1.

-465-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Higher Education for Business
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 494

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?