Operation Moonlight Sonata: The German Raid on Coventry

By Allan W. Kurki | Go to book overview

6
The Flying Beams

". . . the first World War was fought by chemists, the Second by physicists." Brian Johnson, The Secret War, p. 61


BACKGROUND

By the 1930s, electronics were starting to play an increasingly important role in aerial warfare. In this arena, however, the Germans and the British had progressed along two entirely different courses of development. The British, who were preparing primarily for a defensive stance, had placed their major emphasis on the development of radar for the detection of incoming aircraft. By 1940, they had two types of radar stations in operation: the CH, orchain home, for detecting high-flying aircraft; and the CHL, or chain home low, for detecting aircraft flying at low altitudes. (See Chapter 7.)

Unlike the British, the Germans preferred to rely on electronic navigational aids. Before World War II started, they established a series of medium frequency beacons that transmitted a call sign followed by a 20-second continuous note on the 176-580kc/c band. 1 Aircraft could home in on these signals, and by taking bearings from these transmissions they could establish their precise location. By March of 1940, the Germans had forty-six of these beacons in operation in Germany. After their advances in the west, they installed an additional thirty-eight beacons and eleven broadcasting stations outside of Germany. These were all in operation by September of 1940. The British, however, quickly developed electronic countermeasures for use against these beacons. They transmitted masking beacons, called meacons, to confuse the Luftwaffe flight crews by giving them false bearings.

While the British were perfecting their radar and their defensive measures, the Germans were preparing their offensive electronic equipment and techniques.

-39-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Operation Moonlight Sonata: The German Raid on Coventry
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 182

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.