Appearing so detested that your selfe
Gracious and kinde, had you but seene the manner
Would have throwne by all pitty and remorce
And tooke my office or one more in force.

1400

Amp. Rise deare Mazeres, in our favours rise,
So farre am I from censure to reprove thee
That in my hate to him I chuse and love thee.

Maz. If constant service may be call'd desert, I shall de-
serve.

Amp. Man hath no better part.

Maz. Why this was happily observ'd and follow'd; (a side.
The King will to the Castle late to night,
And tread through all the Vaults, I must attend.

1410

Amp. I wish that at first sight th' hadst forc'd his end. Exit.

Maz. Tis better thus; so my revenge imports;
Now thrive my plots, the end shall make me great,
She mine, the Crowne sits here I am then Compleate. Exit.

IV. iii


Scene. 3.

Enter Queene and her maide with a light.

1420

Que. So, leave us here a while, beare backe the light,
I would not be discovered if he come,
You know his entertainement, so be gone,
I am not chearefull troth, what point so ere
My powers arrive at: I desire a league
With desolate darkedesse, and disconsolate fancies,
There is no musicke in my soule to night.
What should I feare when all my servants faiths
Sleepe in my bounty, and no bribes nor threates,
Can wake them from my safety? for the King,
He's forty leagues rode forth, I heard it lately:
Yet heavinesse like a Tyrant, proud in night
Vsurpes my power, rules where it hath no right. She sleepes.

Enter Roxano as she sleepes with Tymethes hudwinckt.

1430

Tym. Me thinkes this a longer voyage than the first? Rox.

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The Bloody Banquet: A Tragedie
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  • Title Page iii
  • LIST OF IRREGULAR AND DOUBTFUL READINGS ix
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  • THE BLOODIE BANQVET. A TRAGEDIE. *
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