CHAPTER II
A STUDENT COMMANDS HIS OWN DEVELOPMENT

IN THE EIGHTEEN-SEVENTIES the college at Princeton was gradually regaining the reputation that it had held before the Civil War as an ideal school for young gentlemen of the South. Moreover, it was still known as an institution where upcountry youth learned "to preach, to reform, and to lead." Into this tradition young Wilson, a son of the South and a grandson of the middle frontier, fitted well, and as the son of a Presbyterian pastor he was entitled to free tuition. His father had studied at the theological seminary in Princeton; but when Tommie arrived on the college campus he was too shy to present a letter that Dr. Wilson had written to President McCosh.

James McCosh was an educator of whom the Wilsons could approve heartily. Born on the banks of the River Doon, he boasted that he had talked with men who "dr-runk whiskey with Bur-rns." In his mature years he had won renown as a religious reformer, and when he had arrived at Princeton in 1868 he had dared to attack the brutalities of hazing and the societies that had operated in secret, had encouraged sport for sport's sake, and had gone himself to the college games. The boys loved him as much as they feared his righteous wrath and laughed at his burr and his extravagances. He insisted that college students should be treated as growing mortals and not as disembodied intellects and that teachers were, properly, in loco parentis and responsible for developing men of character. Every Sunday afternoon he lectured on religious subjects, and once a week he heard students recite on his lectures and on the Bible.

To make up for inadequate preparation, Tommie's energy at first went mainly into his studies; but in June he was not among the twenty honor students of his class. In sophomore year, however, his mind came into its own, and at the end of his college course he stood among those who for the four years had maintained an average of 90 per cent. The boy gained confidence, and wrote to his father that he had discovered he had a mind. He took notes in the neat shorthand that he had mastered, by correspondence course, as a means of saving time; but he did not rely greatly on his teachers, who were not men of marked genius. His grades in the humanities were consistently higher than those in

-18-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Woodrow Wilson - Vol. 1
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 438

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.