Three Writers in Exile: Pound, Eliot & Joyce

By Doris L. Eder | Go to book overview

Exile was the subject of much of Joyce's work. Most of his major characters--Gabriel Conroy, Richard Rowan, Stephen Dedalus, Leopold Bloom, and H. C. Earwicker--are physical or spiritual exiles. Exile was also the means by which Joyce's work was accomplished. One concludes that the forces compelling Joyce to leave Ireland were stronger and more irresistible than those which impelled Pound and Eliot to leave America. Had they remained, Pound and Eliot might still have been writers, but given the fact that Joyce's sole subject was Dublin, a Dublin scathingly presented down to the last sordid detail, Joyce would never have been published had he remained there.

Of the five stages of Joyce's European hegira, as he called it--Pola-Trieste-Zurich-Paris-Zurich--one feels it did not much matter to him where he was, so long as he could look homeward without ruth and write. Although when he wrote, whatever he heard, saw, or felt became grist to his mill, the influence of his European surroundings on both writer and work appears minimal. 58 Joyce's devotion to his art, however, was so all-absorbed and all-absorbing that everywhere he went others got caught up in the vortex of his coldly passionate and ruthless obsession and were often sacrificed willy nilly to his needs. His mismanagement of everyday life through improvidence and irresponsibility were the obverse of his control over his art. Few writers have left behind letters so punctuated by demands, requests, and entreaties for money. Joyce might therefore be said to have exerted an influence on his human environment disproportionate to its influence on him. His most important and lasting influence, of course, has been on the world in which he lived his entire life-- the patria of letters. There he knew no exile.


NOTES
1
Synge & Anglo-Irish Literature: A Study ( Cork: Cork University Press, 1947), p. 4.
2
Preface to Immaturity ( New York: William H. Wise & Company, 1930), p. xxxviii.

-101-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Three Writers in Exile: Pound, Eliot & Joyce
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction 1
  • Ezra Pound's Odyssey 23
  • Notes 46
  • T. S. Eliot's Search for Roots 51
  • Notes 75
  • Joyce: the Eternal Return 82
  • Notes 101
  • Index 107
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 116

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.