revolution or transformation in the advanced capitalist countries today. One wants to add that the referent here is twofold: not merely the processes in the various Eastern countries which have been understood as an attempt to re-establish the market in one way or another, but also those efforts in the West, particularly under Reagan and Thatcher, to do away with the 'regulations' of the welfare state and return to some purer form of market conditions. We need to take into account the possibility that both of these efforts may fail for structural reasons; but we also need to point out tirelessly the interesting development that the 'market' turns out finally to be as Utopian as socialism has recently been held to be. Under these circumstances, nothing is served by substituting one inert institutional structure (bureaucratic planning) for another inert institutional structure (namely, the market itself). What is wanted is a great collective project in which an active majority of the population participates, as something belonging to it and constructed by its own energies. The setting of social priorities -- also known in the socialist literature as planning -- would have to be a part of such a collective project. It should be clear, however, that virtually by definition the market cannot be a project at all.


Notes
1.
Marx and Engels, Collected Works, vol. 28, New York 1987, p. 180.
2.
'Only two paths stand open to mental research: aesthetics, and also political economy.' Stéphane Mallarmé, "'Magie'", in Variations sur un sujet, in Oeuvres complètes, Paris 1945, p. 399. The phrase, which I used as an epigraph to Marxism and Form, emerges from a complex mediation on poetry, politics, economics, and class written in 1895 at the very dawn of high modernism itself.
3.
Norman P. Barry, On Classical Liberalism and Libertarianism, New York 1987, p. 13.
4.
Ibid., p. 194.
5.
Gary Becker, An Economic Approach to Human Behavior, Chicago 1976, p. 14.
6.
Ibid., p. 217.
7.
Ibid., p. 141.
8.
Barry, On Classical Liberalism, p. 30.
9.
Marx and Engels, Collected Works, vol. 28, pp. 131-2.
10.
Milton Friedman, Capitalism and Democracy, Chicago 1962, p. 39.
11.
See Albert O. Hirschman, The Passions and the Interests, Princeton, NJ 1977, part 1.
12.
"'Periodizing the Sixties'", in The Ideologies of Theory, Minneapolis, MN 1988, vol. 2, pp. 178-208.
13.
T. W. Adorno and Max Horkheimer, Dialectic of Enlightenment, trans. John Cumming , New York 1972, pp. 161-7.
14.
See Jane Feuer, "'Reading Dynasty: Television and Reception Theory'", South Atlantic Quarterly, 88, 2, September 1989, pp. 443-60.
15.
Guy Debord, The Society of the Spectacle, Detroit, MI 1977, ch. 1.
16.
See Barry, On Classical Liberalism, pp. 193-6.

-295-

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Mapping Ideology
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction: The Spectre of Ideology 1
  • Notes 30
  • 1: Messages in a Bottle 34
  • 2: Adorno, Post-Structuralism and the Critique of Identity 46
  • Notes 64
  • 3: The Critique of Instrumental Reason 66
  • Notes 88
  • 4: The Mirror-phase as Formative of the Function of the I 93
  • Notes 99
  • 5: Ideology and Ideological State Apparatuses (Notes towards an Investigation) 100
  • Notes 138
  • 6: The Mechanism of Ideological (Mis)recognition 141
  • Notes 150
  • 7: Determinacy and Indeterminacy in the Theory of Ideology 152
  • Notes 165
  • 8: The New Questions of Subjectivity 167
  • Notes 178
  • 9: Ideology and its Vicissitudes in Western Marxism 179
  • Notes 224
  • 10: Feminism, Ideology, and Deconstruction: A Pragmatist View 227
  • Notes 233
  • 11: Ideology, Politics, Hegemony 235
  • Notes 262
  • 12: Doxa and Common Life: An Interview 265
  • Note 277
  • 13: Postmodernism and the Market 278
  • Notes 295
  • 14: How Did Marx Invent the Symptom? 296
  • Notes 331
  • List of Sources 332
  • Index 333
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