Realignment and Party Revival: Understanding American Electoral Politics at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century

By Arthur Paulson | Go to book overview

NOTES
1.
John H. Aldrich, Why Parties? The Origin and Transformation of Party Politics in America ( Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1995), pp. 97-125.
2.
See Joel H. Silbey, "Beyond Realignment and Realignment Theory," in Byron E. Shafer , ed., The End of Realignment? Interpreting American Electoral Eras ( Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1991), pp. 3-23.
3.
Earl Black and Merle Black, The Vital South: How Presidents Are Elected ( Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1992), pp. 213-240.
4.
See Nelson W. Polsby, The Consequences of Party Reform ( Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1983), and Austin Ranney, Curing the Mischiefs of Faction: Party Reform in America ( Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1975).
5.
Nelson W. Polsby and Aaron Wildavsky, Presidential Elections: Contemporary Strategies of American Electoral Politics ( New York: The Free Press, 1991), pp. 42-96.
6.
Theodore H. White, The Making of the President 1972 ( New York: Atheneum Publishers, 1973), pp. 195-198.
7.
Gerald R. Ford, A Time to Heal: The Autobiography of Gerald R. Ford ( New York: Harper and Row, 1979), p. 66. Mr. Ford defines himself as a "liberal" on foreign policy because he was an internationalist. "Internationalism versus isolationism" shaped the factional politics of the Republican Party in the early days of Ford's political career, and Ford himself was a supporter of Wendell Willkie and Arthur Vandenburg when he was breaking into politics. See Chapter 3 for a discussion of the internationalist-versus-isolationist debate within the Republican Party between 1940 and 1952.
8.
Ibid., pp. 63-123.
9.
Jules Witcover, Marathon: The Pursuit of the Presidency 1972-1976 ( New York: Viking Press, 1977), p. 92.
10.
Ibid., p. 47.
11.
Ibid., p. 51.
12.
Ibid., pp. 408-414.
13.
Data for Presidential primaries is drawn or derived from Presidential Elections, 1789-1996 ( Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly, 1997). Data for conventions is derived or drawn from National Party Conventions, 1831-1996 ( Washington, D.C.: 1997).
14.
Witcover, pp. 443-503.
15.
Ibid., pp. 473-486.
16.
Ibid., p. 500.
17.
Much of the discussion concerning the race for the 1976 Democratic Presidential nomination is drawn from Witcover, pp. 105-370. See Presidential Elections, 1789-1996, pp. 186-190 for data on primaries.
18.
See Witcover, pp. 105-118.
19.
The Gallup Poll, November 22, 1979, reported in George H. Gallup, The Gallup Poll: Public Opinion 1979 ( Wilmington, Del.: Scholarly Resources, 1980), p. 280.
20.
Byron E. Shafer, Bifurcated Politics ( Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1988), pp. 100-107.
21.
David Broder, "Democrats," in David Broder, Lou Cannon, Haynes Johnson, Martin Schram, and Richard Harwood, The Pursuit of the Presidency 1980 ( New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1980), p. 199.

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