Women and the Politics of Empowerment

By Ann Bookman; Sandra Morgen | Go to book overview

10
Women, Unions, and "Participative Management": Organizing in the Sunbelt

Louise Lamphere

Guillermo J. Grenier

As more and more working mothers enter the labor force, the structure of industries that employ women is changing. Not only are apparel and electronics firms establishing "runaway shops" in Mexico, the Caribbean, and Southeast Asia, but corporations with branch plants remaining in the United States are "modernizing" their management policies. With the increasing popularity of "quality circles" (adapted from Japanese models), firms have enthusiastically embraced various forms of "participative management" -- policies that purport to give workers a measure of control over their work environment. Yet beneath the ethic of participation is often a clear antiunion stance. Women who work in these firms are facing a new workplace where modern plant equipment is often combined with management policies that limit women's ability to organize.

In this article we examine the use of participative management policies during a union drive at a new plant in the Southwest. Since the plant work force was dominantly female and included a large proportion of Hispanic women workers, many of whom were mothers, the case helps us to understand the complex interrelationship between labor activism, gender, and ethnicity. We argue that no one factor accounts for the union's loss by a two-to-one vote. Participative management techniques, the firm's use of legal and illegal antiunion tactics, and the economic vulnerability of young women workers all played a role. In addition, the union's failure to campaign for community support may have been a factor. More important, our interpretation emphasizes the process of the union drive itself and the factors at work in building workers' consciousness of the need for a union, as well as the timing of later management countertactics. A promising start was turned around by a stepped-up, highly orchestrated antiunion campaign.

-227-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Women and the Politics of Empowerment
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 324

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.