The Divorce of Catherine of Aragon: The Story as Told by the Imperial Ambassadors Resident at the Court of Henry VIII

By J. A. Froude | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XV

The Papal curse -- Determined attitude of the Princess Mary -- Chapuys desires to be heard in Parliament -- Interview with the King -- Permission refused -- The Act of Succession -- Catherine loses the title of Queen -- More and Fisher refuse to swear to the statute -- Prospects of rebellion in Ireland --The Emperor unwilling to> interfere -- Perplexity of the Catholic party -- Chapuys before the Privy Council -- Insists on Catherine's rights -- Singular defence of the Pope's action -- Chapuys's intrigues -- Defiant attitude of Catherine -- Fears for her life -- Condition of Europe -- Prospect of war between France and the Empire -- Unwillingness of the Emperor to interfere in England -- Disappointment of Catherine -- Visit of Cha- puys to Kimbolton.

PRETENDERS to supernatural powers usually confine the display of their skill to the presence of friends and believers. The exercise of such powers to silence opponents or to convince incredulity may be alleged to have existed in the past, or may be foretold as to happen in the future; in the actual present prudent men are cautious of experiments which, if they fail, bring them only into ridicule. Excommunication had real terrors when a frightened world was willing to execute its penalties -- when the object of the censure was cut off from the services of religion and was regarded as a pariah and an outlaw. The Princes of Europe had real cause to fear the curse of the Pope when their own subjects might withdraw their obedience and the Christian Powers were ready to take arms to coerce them. But Clement knew that his own thunders would find no such support, and he lacked the confi-

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The Divorce of Catherine of Aragon: The Story as Told by the Imperial Ambassadors Resident at the Court of Henry VIII
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • The Divorce of Catherine of Aragon 1
  • Chapter I 21
  • Chapter II 41
  • Chapter III. 62
  • Chapter IV. 70
  • Chapter V 86
  • Chapter VI 99
  • Chapter VII. 110
  • Chapter VIII. 131
  • Chapter IX. 141
  • Chapter X 157
  • Chapter XI 175
  • Chapter XII 192
  • Chapter XIII. 218
  • Chapter XIV. 243
  • Chapter XV. 260
  • Chapter XVI. 283
  • Chapter XVII. 301
  • Chapter XVIII 318
  • Chapter XIX 347
  • Chapter XX 371
  • Chapter XXI 389
  • Chapter XXII 412
  • Chapter XXIII 436
  • Chapter XXIV 450
  • Index 465
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