The Other Mary Shelley: Beyond Frankenstein

By Audrey A. Fisch; Anne K. Mellor et al. | Go to book overview

The Other Mary Shelley
Beyond Frankenstein

Edited by AUDREY A. FISCH ANNE K. MELLOR ESTHER H. SCHOR

New York Oxford OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS 1993

-iii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Other Mary Shelley: Beyond Frankenstein
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents ix
  • Introduction 3
  • I - ROMANTICISM AND RESISTANCE 15
  • Mary Shelley's Sympathy and Irony: The Editor and Her Corpus 17
  • Notes 35
  • Editorial Privilege: Mary Shelley and Percy Shelley's Audiences 39
  • Notes 62
  • Reading Mary Shelley's Journals: Romantic Subjectivity and Feminist Criticism 73
  • Notes 86
  • Mary Shelley and the Taming of the Byronic Hero: "Transformation" and The Deformed Transformed 89
  • Notes 104
  • The Last Man: Apocalypse Without Millennium 107
  • Notes 121
  • Proserpine and Midas: Gender, Genre, and Mythic Revisionism in Mary Shelley's Dramas 124
  • Notes 136
  • Beatrice in Valperga: A New Cassandra 140
  • Notes 157
  • God's Sister: History and Ideology in Valperga 159
  • Notes 179
  • II - CULTURE AND CRITICISM 183
  • Swayed by Contraries: Mary Shelley and the Everyday 185
  • Notes 198
  • Disfiguring Economies: Mary Shelley's Short Stories 204
  • Notes 218
  • Subversive Surfaces: The Limits of Domestic Affection in Mary Shelley's Later Fiction 220
  • Notes 233
  • Mary Shelley in Transit 235
  • Notes 254
  • The Last Man 258
  • Notes 266
  • Plaguing Politics: AIDS, Deconstruction, and The Last Man 267
  • Notes 281
  • Contributors 287
  • Index 289
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 300

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.