Our Hands Are Tied: Legal Tensions and Medical Ethics

By Marshall B. Kapp | Go to book overview

4
Doing Everything: Treating Legal Fears near the End of Life

A firm legal ( Meisel, 1992) and ethical ( Hastings Center, 1987) position has developed in the United States over the past quarter century in favor of shared medical decision making, including but not limited to ( Wolf & Becker, 1996) decisions regarding the critically ill and dying. This position is premised on a process of communication and negotiation over time taking place among the mentally capable patient, family members and significant friends, physician, and other members of the health care team (President's Commission, 1982; Cummins, 1992; Miller Coe, & Hyers, 1992). Such a process best embodies the important value of individual patient autonomy ( Gauthier, 1993).

Recent studies have scientifically documented through health services research techniques what health care providers, patients, and families have long known by instinct and personal observation ( Quill, 1995)--namely, that medical care near the end of life too often deviates widely from the clinical, emotional, and indeed ethical ideal. In the early 1990s, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation headquartered in Princeton, New Jersey, lavishly funded the Study to Understand Prognosis and Preferences for Outcomes and Risks of Treatment (SUPPORT), designed to increase understanding of the process of hospitalized dying and to devise interventions--that is, improved communications, clarification and coordination of patient and family pref

-65-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Our Hands Are Tied: Legal Tensions and Medical Ethics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • References xiv
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • 1 - Losing at the Lottery: Physician Perceptions of the Legal Environment 1
  • Notes 22
  • Notes 23
  • 2 - The Lawyer Made Me Do It: from Legal Perception to Medical Practice 27
  • Note 46
  • References 46
  • 3 - Risk Managers and Legal Counsel: Ethical Enablers or Paid Paranoids? 53
  • References 64
  • 4 - Doing Everything: Treating Legal Fears near the End of Life 65
  • Note 87
  • References 88
  • 5 - Who Is Responsible for This? Everyday Patient Intrusions to Protect the Provider 97
  • Note 118
  • References 118
  • 6 - A Dispirited Lot: Malpractice and What Else? 123
  • 7 - Reconciling Risk Management and Medical Ethics: Opportunities and Obstacles 141
  • References 164
  • Index 171
  • Bout the Author 177
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 180

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.