Women's Rights in the United States: A Documentary History

By Winston E. Langley; Vivian C. Fox | Go to book overview

out and reward the author are evidenced by the resolution of Mr. Roscoe Conkling, in the House of Representatives 24th of February, 1862. . . . But it was deemed prudent to make no public claim as to authorship while the war lasted. . . .

The wisdom of the plan was proven, not only by the absolute advantages which resulted, giving the mastery of the conflict to the National arms and evermore assuring their success even against the powers of all Europe should they have combined, but it was likewise proven by the failures to open the Mississippi or win any decided success on the plan first devised by the Government.

It is further conclusively shown that no plan, order, letter, telegram, or suggestion of the Tennessee River as the line of invasion has ever produced, except in the paper submitted by Miss Carroll on the 30th of November 1861, and her subsequent letters to the Government as the campaign progressed. . . .

In view of all the facts, this Committee believe that the thanks of the nation are due Miss Carroll, and that they are fully justified in recommending that she be placed on the pension rolls of the Government, as a partial measure of recognition for her public service, and report herewith a bill for such purpose and recommend its passage. . . .

Source: Stanton, Anthony, and Gage, HWS, 2: 863-864.


DOCUMENT 49: The Loyal Women of the Country to Abraham Lincoln (1863)

In this brief but eloquent statement of loyalty and commendation for the Emancipation Proclamation, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, on behalf of the Women's National Loyal League, appeals to President Lincoln to "finish the work by declaring . . . justice and protection" for all women in the country. The request no doubt would include those rights for women found in the resolutions to the national women's rights conventions held prior to the war. Inspired by the Emancipation Proclamation, the appeal reflects the optimism of this group of women who labored during the antebellum period not only for themselves but for the rights of blacks.

We come not to criticise or complain. Not for ourselves or our friends do we ask redress of specific grievances, or posts of honor or emolument. We speak from no considerations of mere material gain; but, inspired by

-125-

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