Taking Charge: Crisis Intervention in Criminal Justice

By Anne T. Romano | Go to book overview

Crisis Intervention in Property Crimes
Restoring power to victims of property crimes is important. This restoration of power may be accomplished in many ways. A criminal justice worker has symbolic authority, which includes an aura of power to assist those who are in need. Some of this power can be returned to the victims if the intervener will do the following
1. Ask permission. "May I ask you some questions now?" "Do you mind if I take notes on this?"
2. Accept credibility. One can listen discerningly without conveying suspicion.
3. Perception of criticism. Realize the forces that generate hostility and do not react to implied criticism such as: "What can you people do for me now?" or "It's too late, everything's gone."
4. Guilt Reduction. Try to help victims realize that the negative self-evaluation they might be engaging in is unfair and nonproductive.
5. Importance. Make the victims feel that their cases are important. However, do not make any promises that cannot be kept. Consider all property taken as valuable. The critical point here is that I am in no way implying or suggesting that victims be falsely appeased. Saying to the victim, "Don't worry, we'll get your property back" would be a disservice to all involved. Also, to say "Forget it, you'll never see your belongings again" would be just as nonproductive. Once again, the important concern should be "What do you need now in your moment of crisis?"

SUMMARY

In this chapter the study of the victim is discussed. Victims suffer emotional, psychological, and physical trauma that is initiated by the crisis event. The victim may reach out for help while in any one of the four stages of victimology. The intervener may adjust the response mode accordingly so as to have a stabilizing effect on the victim.

During Stage 1, Shock, Disbelief, and Denial, victims are preoccupied with convincing themselves that the crisis did not occur. Therefore, they are not receptive to a logical and productive interchange. The intervener must be patient and wait for this period of preoccupation to pass.

During Stage 2, Fright and Blaming, the victims experience fear and a need to place blame. The intervener should be aware that victims may raise their voices or attempt to blame the intervener for their condition. This is not a personal issue, but is merely an expression of emotional need. Furthermore, the intervener may also expect to see a possible switch in behavior. Some victims may express clinging behavior, attempting to keep the intervener close to them, while blaming the intervener at the same time. This is not unusual behavior.

During Stage 3, Anger and Apathy, victims will reach out for help in

-74-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Taking Charge: Crisis Intervention in Criminal Justice
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Criminology and Penology ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Tables and Figures ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Introduction xvii
  • Chapter 1 an Integrated Approach to Crisis Intervention 1
  • SUMMARY 9
  • Chapter 2 Defining and Identifying Crisis 11
  • SUMMARY 27
  • Chapter 3 Communication in Crisis Situations 29
  • Chapter 4 Crisis Intervention: Theory and Practice 49
  • Chapter 5 Crisis Intervention with Victims 61
  • SUMMARY 74
  • Chapter 6 Specific Groups 77
  • Chapter 7 Victims of Violence 113
  • Chapter 8 Crisis Intervener Crises 157
  • Conclusion 167
  • Bibliography 169
  • Index 179
  • About the Author 184
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 186

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.