Richard M. Nixon: Politician, President, Administrator

By Leon Friedman; William F. Levantrosser | Go to book overview

About the Editors and Contributors

STEPHEN E. AMBROSE is the Boyd Professor of History at the University of New Orleans and Director of the Eisenhower Center. He is the author of biographies of Eisenhower and Nixon.

M. MARK AMEN is Associate Professor and Director of the International Studies Program within the Department of Government and International Affairs at the University of South Florida. His principal research interest is the political economy of industrialized nations. He is author of American Foreign Policy in Greece: 1944-1949 and is currently finishing a monograph on the rate of profit in the United States since 1945.

ROY L. ASH, co-founder and former president of Litton Industries, headed President Nixon's Advisory Council on Executive Organization (the Ash Council) which followed in the pattern of the earlier Hoover Commissions. Among its recommendations was the formation of the Office of Management and Budget, which he subsequently headed during the Nixon and Ford administrations.

MICHAEL P. BALZANO, Jr. is the president of Balzano Associates. He was an Assistant to the President in the Nixon White House. In 1973 he was appointed Director of ACTION, the federal volunteer agency. He was a Visiting Fellow at the American Enterprise Institute where he authored "Reorganizing the Federal Bureaucracy: The Rhetoric and Reality," "The Peace Corps: Myths and Prospects," and "Federalizing Meals on Wheels." In 1981 he became Director of Government Affairs for the Joint Maritime Congress. In 1985 he established the company he now directs.

HERMAN A. BERLINER is Acting Provost and Dean of Faculties, as well as Professor of Business Economics at Hofstra University. He is also Associate

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