Multiculturalism and Public Arts Policy

By David B. Pankratz | Go to book overview

evaluation--one that seeks to clarify the language used to express value positions and policy goals and the other that calculates the potential effects of programs implied in the definitions of key terms. Policies' means, in turn, can be analyzed in terms of whether they are likely to effect achievement of policy goals in a fair, cost-effective manner, with minimal negative side effects.

This integrated methodology is, I believe, an appropriate and potentially powerful means of analyzing policy issues surrounding multiculturalism and public support of the arts. Policy debates in arts policy too often do not explicitly acknowledge, let alone explicate, the value positions behind policy proposals. This tendency, as will be seen, is most evident in the policy documents of those public agencies whose policies can and do have significant effects on the practice of the arts. Thus, considerable attention will be given to explicating, in the manner of interpretive policy analysis, the value positions of public arts agencies as expressed in their usage of terms such as art, culture, justice, and artistic value in premises and arguments in support of policy goals. But beyond merely understanding the point of view of these policy actors, the attempt will be made to rationally assess their use of these value-laden terms as well as the theoretical assumptions that inform premises in their arguments for policy goals. This rational assessment will be achieved through the double evaluation of key concepts both on formal, logical grounds and in terms of potential practical consequences of the programs implied in value-laden definitions of these terms.


NOTES
1.
Bruce Jennings, "Policy Analysis: Science, Advocacy, or Counsel?" in Stuart S. Nagel, ed., Research in Public Policy Analysis and Management, 4 ( Greenwich, CT: JAI Press, 1987), p. 124.
2.
Bruce Jennings, "Interpretation and the Practice of Policy Analysis," in Frank Fischer and John Forester, eds., Confronting Values in Policy Analysis: The Politics of Criteria (Newbury Park, CA: Sage Publications, 1987), pp. 136-137.
4.
For further discussion of "value noncognitivism," see Frank Fischer , Politics, Values, and Public Policy: The Problem of Methodology ( Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1980).
5.
M. E. Hawkesworth, Theoretical Issues in Policy Analysis ( Albany: State University of New York Press, 1988), p. 14.
6.
Ibid.

-48-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Multiculturalism and Public Arts Policy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Tables ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction: Policy Contexts in the Arts 1
  • Notes 7
  • 1 - Multiculturalism and Arts Policy Research 9
  • Notes 24
  • 2 - Foundations of Policy Research Methodologies 29
  • Notes 48
  • 3 - An Interpretation of Arts Policy Mechanisms 51
  • Notes 110
  • 4 - Conceptual Issues, Multiculturalism, and Arts Policy Mechanisms 119
  • Notes 187
  • 5 - Epilogue: Prospects for Policy Research in the Arts 197
  • Notes 202
  • Bibliography 203
  • Index 221
  • About the Author 233
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 236

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.