Multiculturalism and Public Arts Policy

By David B. Pankratz | Go to book overview

African-American, and Hispanic descent. The diverse conceptual foundations of different affirmative action programs are a potent source of value conflict within arts policy, a state of affairs requiring considerable analysis.

A final conceptual issue that emerged from interpretation of the policy mechanisms of state arts agencies, especially the open-access-to-funding policy mechanism, is that of artistic value. In terms of a value conflict, claims and counterclaims were found surrounding the notion that artistic value is relative to specific cultural traditions. Resolution of this conflict through conceptual analysis is a matter of addressing a major philosophical question: Is value in art best thought of as one thing or as many? Yet once this question is raised, other questions then must be considered: Does artistic value reside in art objects or in responding individuals? What claims can be made for the aesthetic, cognitive, moral, and religious value of art? In what ways does the value of art reside in its social and cultural functions?

Analysis of the value conflicts surrounding concepts of cultural pluralism, the relations of art to culture, justice and affirmative action, and artistic value, and the implications of these concepts for choice among arts policy mechanism options, forms the subject for Chapter 4.


NOTES
1.
For discussion of this argument, see Stanley N. Katz, "Influences on Public Policies in the United States," in W. McNeil Lowry, ed., The Arts and Public Policy in the United States (Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1984).
2.
For a historical overview, see Livingston C. Biddle, Our Government and the Arts: A Perspective from the Inside ( New York: American Council for the Arts, 1988).
3.
Edward C. Banfield, The Democratic Muse: Visual Arts and the Public Interest ( New York: Basic Books, 1984).
4.
For detailed discussion of this argument, see Samuel Lipman, Arguing for Music, Arguing for Culture ( Boston: David R. Godine, 1990).
5.
For a discussion of this and other models of relations between private and public sectors in the arts, see Paul J. DiMaggio, "Can Culture Survive the Marketplace?" Journal of Arts Management and Law 13 (Spring 1983): 61-87.
6.
These figures are reported in Independent Commission, A Report to Congress on the National Endowment for the Arts ( Washington, DC: Independent Commission, 1990).
7.
See, for example, Testimony of Alberta Arthurs ( Rockefeller Foundation), Karen Brosius ( Philip Morris Companies, Inc.), Cynthia

-110-

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Multiculturalism and Public Arts Policy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Tables ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction: Policy Contexts in the Arts 1
  • Notes 7
  • 1 - Multiculturalism and Arts Policy Research 9
  • Notes 24
  • 2 - Foundations of Policy Research Methodologies 29
  • Notes 48
  • 3 - An Interpretation of Arts Policy Mechanisms 51
  • Notes 110
  • 4 - Conceptual Issues, Multiculturalism, and Arts Policy Mechanisms 119
  • Notes 187
  • 5 - Epilogue: Prospects for Policy Research in the Arts 197
  • Notes 202
  • Bibliography 203
  • Index 221
  • About the Author 233
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