Terrains of Resistance: Nonviolent Social Movements and the Contestation of Place in India

By Paul Routledge; John Agnew | Go to book overview

Chapter 3
The Baliapal Movement

Listen, brothers and sisters
This monstrous missile base will devour Baliapal.
The government will offer hefty prices for your land
Not "for the spinning mill" but for this inauspicious base.
If you sell your land, you're digging your own grave
They will pay you for your death summons.
It is not a spinning mill, it is a death factory
It will spin your doom.

-- Purushottam Behera (translation by Unnayan)

Baliapal, located in the north of the state of Orissa on India's Bay of Bengal coast, became, in 1986, the site of an ongoing struggle between the resident farmers and fisherfolk and the central government and military establishment of India. The emergence and character of the Baliapal movement were a result of a variety of place- specific factors that can be elucidated by a consideration of location, locale and sense of place. First, in considering the background to the movement, I show the importance of location and locale. I will then show the importance of locale and sense of place in the formation of Baliapal's nonviolent terrain of resistance, as well as discussing the movement's relationship to political parties and the state.

-39-

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Terrains of Resistance: Nonviolent Social Movements and the Contestation of Place in India
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Maps and Tables ix
  • Foreword xi
  • Preface xv
  • Acknowledgments xix
  • Chapter 1 Development and Resistance in India 1
  • Notes 19
  • Chapter 2 Putting Social Movements in Their Place: Social Movement Theory and the Spatial Mediation of Nonviolent Resistance Terrains 21
  • Notes 38
  • Chapter 3 the Baliapal Movement 39
  • Notes 73
  • Chapter 4 the Chipko Movement 75
  • Note 118
  • Chapter 5 India's Terrains of Resistance 119
  • Notes 134
  • Chapter 6 Social Movements, Place and Nonviolent Sanctions 135
  • Notes 149
  • Bibliography 151
  • Index 167
  • About the Author 171
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