Terrains of Resistance: Nonviolent Social Movements and the Contestation of Place in India

By Paul Routledge; John Agnew | Go to book overview

interrelationship between domestic and international politics, the prose­cution of nonviolent action at one level can also have dramatic consequences at another level, as the experiences of Eastern Europe attest. However, as Kruegler ( 1991) notes, much research is still required into the nature and dynamics of nonviolent conflict, including detailed analyses of nonviolent action by civil society (such as that within Eastern Europe in 1989); the effects of mixing nonviolent with violent means of struggle; whether predominantly nonviolent conflict is more or less conducive to efficient and durable settlements; whether societies are condemned to perpetual improvisation with nonviolent sanctions or whether such behaviors can be learned, transmitted and institutionalized as policy; and the systemic effects of intrastate nonviolent conflicts, especially as they relate to the character and capabilities of important international actors.

Although I have concluded this book with a brief section on the broader implications of nonviolent sanctions, the essence and message of this work speak to the local, the particular and the human dimensions of conflict. Through my focus on the spatial mediation of social movement agency, I hope to have shown how the specifics of location, locale and sense of place inform, motivate and inspire both those involved in the everyday practice of struggle and those concerned with the theorizing and understanding of social movement conflicts. The geographical concept of place provides crucial insights into the context, character, dynamics and outcomes of social movement practice and how these are expressed as terrains of resistance. The concept of place can also provide intimate insights into the spirit of people's resistance. For, as the experiences of the Baliapal and Chipko movements attest, while the success or failure of a social movement is of crucial concern when people are confronted with struggles for cultural, political and economic survival, the very fact that they resist speaks directly to the critical elements of human trans­formation: participation, communication and self-realization.


NOTES
1.
Sharp ( 1973) notes 198 methods of nonviolent action, while stressing that his list is not intended to be complete.
2.
The following discussion owes much to the theoretical analysis contained within Transforming Struggle ( Program on Nonviolent Sanctions 1992) and to discussions with colleagues at the Program on Nonviolent Sanctions and the Albert Einstein Institution, especially Douglas Bond, Christopher Kruegler and William Vogele.

-149-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Terrains of Resistance: Nonviolent Social Movements and the Contestation of Place in India
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Maps and Tables ix
  • Foreword xi
  • Preface xv
  • Acknowledgments xix
  • Chapter 1 Development and Resistance in India 1
  • Notes 19
  • Chapter 2 Putting Social Movements in Their Place: Social Movement Theory and the Spatial Mediation of Nonviolent Resistance Terrains 21
  • Notes 38
  • Chapter 3 the Baliapal Movement 39
  • Notes 73
  • Chapter 4 the Chipko Movement 75
  • Note 118
  • Chapter 5 India's Terrains of Resistance 119
  • Notes 134
  • Chapter 6 Social Movements, Place and Nonviolent Sanctions 135
  • Notes 149
  • Bibliography 151
  • Index 167
  • About the Author 171
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 174

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.