Human Resource Management and the Americans with Disabilities Act

By John G. Veres III; Ronald R. Sims | Go to book overview
marginal functions should be added to the responsibilities and duties of the disabled worker to keep his or her workload as similar as possible to that of co-workers.
6. Make sure that perceptions of inequity are not based in fact. If a worker must leave early one afternoon, make sure that worker arrives early or leaves later on another day. If disabled workers are given the option of completing their work at home, management should consider whether it would be in the organization's best interest to extend that option to all employees. While it may not always be possible to achieve "eye of God" equity, this should certainly be management's goal. Perceptions of inequity will be extraordinarily difficult to overcome if they are based in fact.
7. Keep the appraisal process the same for all employees. The actual appraisal process should be performed in a way that is, as closely as possible, the same for all employees. Disabled workers should be held to the same standards on job duties that are not affected by disability. When accommodations are made, standards that are fair and equitable, given the set of circumstances, should be developed.
8. Lines of communication should remain open. Performance standards should be communicated to all employees. In addition, performance expectations, evaluation methodologies, and the determination of salary adjustment and raises should be communicated. Employees should be encouraged to surface any of their misgivings, such as feelings of inequity, regarding the performance appraisal process.

Combining the ideas outlined in numbers 7 and 8 above, more than one source of appraisal information should be used for all workers. Besides the supervisor's evaluation, input should be obtained from the disabled worker's peers and from the disabled workers ( Cascio, 1991). In this way, a more informed evaluation of a worker's performance can be obtained. Supervisors, however, should be aware of the potential biases in the ratings, which may occur due to attitudes toward disabled individuals.


CONCLUSION

Unfortunately, regardless of the steps taken to ensure and maintain a fair appraisal system, some employees will still perceive unfairness. It is not possible for everything to be equal for all workers under ADA. The reality is that even without ADA, a perception of equality will be difficult to achieve and maintain. Factoring in the misconceptions and prejudices toward individuals with disabilities further compounds the dilemma. Equity and fairness is always the goal in performance appraisal, but it is a goal that is infrequently achieved.

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