Comparative Empirical Analysis of Cultural Values and Perceptions of Political Economy Issues

By Dan Voich; George Macesich | Go to book overview

1
Overview of Cultural Values

INTRODUCTION

This book is the second volume on the impact of culture-based values on political economy issues. The first volume, Cross Cultural Analysis of Values and Political Economy Issues ( Voich and Stepina, eds., Praeger, 1994), provided some introductory material and a general overview of the research issues for this chapter. While the first book primarily dealt with reviews of relevant literature and historical surveys of values and political economy issues, this book focuses on the analysis of empirical data. These empirical data were compiled in eight countries throughout the world through a lengthy survey questionnaire administered by faculty peers in each respective country. These faculty collaborated as members of the International Consortium for Management Studies that was organized in 1989. The eight countries represented in this empirical research are Chile, the Federal Republic of Germany, the former Soviet Union, Japan, the People's Republic of China, the United States, Venezuela, and Yugoslavia.

Defining culture has proved to be a difficult exercise. Volumes have been produced by anthropologists attempting to pin down the concept of culture. One area of general agreement is that individuals in the same culture tend to share common values. Values are deeply held assumptions about how things should be and about how these ends should be achieved. Values, in turn, lead to a set of specific ideas or personalities in the form of attitudes. Finally, attitudes are the precursors to behavior.

While there is general theoretical agreement concerning the relationships among the variables described, there has been little empirical research on how values, beliefs, and attitudes vary cross-culturally. Beyond G. Hofstede ( 1980) groundbreaking research on values, and other polls on attitudes, few researchers have gone beyond simple two-

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Comparative Empirical Analysis of Cultural Values and Perceptions of Political Economy Issues
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures and Tables ix
  • Foreword xv
  • Preface xvii
  • 1 - Overview of Cultural Values 1
  • Introduction 1
  • 2 - Research Purpose, Procedures, and Demographics 17
  • Introduction 17
  • 3 - Profile of Individualism Values 33
  • SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS 61
  • 4 - Profile of Collectivism Values 69
  • SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS 86
  • 5 - Profile of Value Priorities 91
  • SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS 101
  • 6 - Profile of Organizational Issues 105
  • SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS 123
  • 7 - Profile of National Issues 127
  • SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS 142
  • 8: Profile of International Issues 145
  • SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS 176
  • 10 - Socioeconomic and Political Tenets 181
  • SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS 192
  • 11 - Relationships Between Values and Perceptions of Issues 195
  • SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS 206
  • Appendix 11a - Significance Levels for T-Ratios 211
  • 12 - Summary, Conclusions, and Future Directions for Research 229
  • Bibliography 243
  • Index 253
  • About the Author 258
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