Comparative Empirical Analysis of Cultural Values and Perceptions of Political Economy Issues

By Dan Voich; George Macesich | Go to book overview

SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS

This chapter compares the perceived relative overall favorableness of the national climate by respondents from the eight countries surveyed. This comparison focuses on three broad issues that reflect the respondents' perceptions of the existence of favorable factors that tend to enhance the overall national sociopolitical and economic climate in each country surveyed: (1) economic climate for productivity and growth, (2) standard of living, and (3) sociopolitical climate.

Using the Scheffe test results that compared the mean responses of respondents from each country with the mean responses of respondents for each of the other seven countries, Table 7.4 summarizes the perceived overall favorableness of the national climate as measured by the three issues. The numerical data shown on Table 7.4 are taken from Tables 7.1 through 7.3, and they reflect the frequencies of significantly higher mean responses (.05 level), using the Scheffe test of paired comparisons. The focus of these comparisons is on the significant differences in the perceived national climate, rather than simply the level of perceptions as measured by a mean response score.

On the basis of 21 paired comparisons of mean responses for the combined three issues, the respondents from Germany perceive a higher overall favorable level of the national climate in 16 of 21 cases (76 percent), followed by the respondents from the People's Republic of China in 13 of 21 cases (62 percent), the United States in 12 of 21 cases (57 percent), and Japan and Chile in 11 of 21 cases (52 percent for each). The combined respondents from three market-oriented countries have the highest perception of an overall favorable national climate (39 of 51, or 76 percent), compared to the combined respondents from the three collectivist countries (17 of 51, or 33 percent) and the two Latin American countries (11 of 42, or 26 percent).

The relative perceptions of an overall favorable national climate as shown on Table 7.4 in a general way reflect the sociopolitical and economic problems that currently exist in each of these eight countries. The three market-oriented countries, plus the People's Republic of China and Chile, have more favorable economic climates and standards of living. The relatively lower perceptions of a favorable sociopolitical climate in Yugoslavia, Venezuela, and the former Soviet Union seem consistent with current conditions in these countries.

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Comparative Empirical Analysis of Cultural Values and Perceptions of Political Economy Issues
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures and Tables ix
  • Foreword xv
  • Preface xvii
  • 1 - Overview of Cultural Values 1
  • Introduction 1
  • 2 - Research Purpose, Procedures, and Demographics 17
  • Introduction 17
  • 3 - Profile of Individualism Values 33
  • SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS 61
  • 4 - Profile of Collectivism Values 69
  • SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS 86
  • 5 - Profile of Value Priorities 91
  • SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS 101
  • 6 - Profile of Organizational Issues 105
  • SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS 123
  • 7 - Profile of National Issues 127
  • SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS 142
  • 8: Profile of International Issues 145
  • SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS 176
  • 10 - Socioeconomic and Political Tenets 181
  • SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS 192
  • 11 - Relationships Between Values and Perceptions of Issues 195
  • SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS 206
  • Appendix 11a - Significance Levels for T-Ratios 211
  • 12 - Summary, Conclusions, and Future Directions for Research 229
  • Bibliography 243
  • Index 253
  • About the Author 258
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