Comparative Empirical Analysis of Cultural Values and Perceptions of Political Economy Issues

By Dan Voich; George Macesich | Go to book overview
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the combined responses to the six issues referred to above (1, 5, 7, 8, 10, and 13), using five groups of frequency responses. The chi square analysis indicates that there are some significant differences (.00 level) in the overall rank of this combined set of six issues according to the country of the respondents (.46 coefficient of contingency). The range of mean ranks of respondent groups shown on Table 9.4 is from 6.67 ( Germany) to 8.75 (the People's Republic of China), with an average rank of 7.27. This tends to indicate a lower overall priority for this issue by all respondent groups.The ANOVA Scheffe test results indicate where differences in mean ranks are significant for the respondent groups. Respondents from Germany have the greatest frequency of higher priority of this issue, as reflected in the lowest mean rank in 5 of 7 paired comparisons, followed by the respondents from Yugoslavia, the former Soviet Union, and Chile (2 of 7 paired comparisons each). The respondents from the People's Republic of China (0 of 7) place the lowest priority on this issue, followed by those from the United States, Japan, and Venezuela (1 of 7 each).
SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS
This chapter develops a profile of issue priorities for respondents from each of the eight countries surveyed. These priorities are based on the results of the analysis of three levels of issues, organizational (Chapter 6), national (Chapter 7), and international (Chapter 8), plus the ranking of the 15 issues by respondents as discussed earlier. On the basis of the foregoing analysis of issues priorities, a general profile of issues for respondents from each of the eight countries is summarized in the discussion that follows. These profiles reflect the perceptions by each respondent group that have at least four of seven frequencies of significantly higher mean responses using the Scheffe test of paired comparison of means. The following profiles show the general priorities of issues and/or the general perceptions of greater favorableness of organizational, national, and international climates.
Germany: More favorable organizational communications, motivation, job security/standard of living, and productivity; more favorable national economic climate and standard of living; and more favorable international trade/development climate and world governance

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